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I am currently trying to write an ircbot and have gotten stuck. As you can see I define a method for the ircBot class, connect, which creates a socket object. I want to use this object in the sendCmd method, is this possible?

I have been looking around google and stackoverflow but have not been able to work out a solution(probably because I'm rather new to Python). Any hints appreciated!

import socket
import sys
import os

class ircBot:

    def sendCmd(self, cmd):
        SEND_TEXT_ON_OPEN_SOCKET

    def connect(self, server, port):

        s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
        c = s.connect_ex((server, port))

        if c == 111:
            print("Error: " + os.strerror(c))
            sys.exit(1)

            print("Making connection to " + server + "\n")

Regards,

David

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3 Answers 3

The trick is the first parameter to the methods, normally named self in Python. When you call the methods, this parameter is automatically passed.

It's the instance of the class -- so if you do ircbot.sendCmd(cmd), sendCmd gets ircbot as self, and so it could use itself as self.sendCmd if you wanted.

You can add attributes to self, and it adds them to the instance -- this means that what connect does to self, sendCmd will see as well.

import socket
import sys
import os

class IrcBot: # You should consider doing 'class IrcBot(object):'
              # if you're on Python 2, so it's a new-style class
    def sendCmd(self, cmd):
        # use self.s here
        SEND_TEXT_ON_OPEN_SOCKET

    def connect(self, server, port):

        self.s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
        c = self.s.connect_ex((server, port))

        if c == 111: # is this the only return code that matters?
                     # I don't know, you might want to check for others
            print("Error: " + os.strerror(c))
            sys.exit(1)

            print("Making connection to " + server + "\n")

ircbot = IrcBot()
ircbot.connect('localhost', 6667)
ircbot.sendCmd('yourcmd')
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2  
+1 I found a better explanation of the self to be this: classInstance.function(argument) is the equivalent of Class.function(classInstance, argument). –  Gabi Purcaru Aug 21 '11 at 13:58
    
I'm not sure it helps to point out you can call methods on classes directly to people just learning Python / OOP, better to get a sense of the difference between a class and it's instance first. –  agf Aug 21 '11 at 14:01
    
I never thought of that. Good point! –  Gabi Purcaru Aug 21 '11 at 14:02

You need to assign it to a variable which can be accessed outside of connect. Normally this is done by creating something called a member level variable:

class ircBot:

    def sendCmd(self, cmd):
        # SEND_TEXT_ON_OPEN_SOCKET
        s.doSomething()

    def connect(self, server, port):

        s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
        c = s.connect_ex((server, port))

        if c == 111:
            print("Error: " + os.strerror(c))
            # this should probably simply throw an exception. No need to take teh
            # whole system down on socket connection failure.
            sys.exit(1)
        self.s = s
        # I moved this up a level because you could never get to it in the 
        # if statement -- sys.exit leaves the application!
        print("Making connection to " + server + "\n")
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1  
A member level variable? Not an instance variable, or instance attribute? I think that's a .net term, haven't really heard it used in Python? –  agf Aug 21 '11 at 14:23
import socket
import sys
import os

class ircBot:

    def sendCmd(self, cmd):
        if self.s is None:
           raise "Not connected to a server"
        self.s.send(cmd)

    def connect(self, server, port):

        self.s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
        c = self.s.connect_ex((server, port))

        if c == 111:
            print("Error: " + os.strerror(c))
            sys.exit(1)

            print("Making connection to " + server + "\n")
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