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I am trying to make a loop that will go through a set of text files in specified directory searching for a string. The result is reported based on whether the string is found. But the %errorlevel% always returns 0 and evaluates to 0.

SETLOCAL enabledelayedexpansion

    FOR %%G IN (*.txt) DO (
        find /i "My text string" "%%G"
        ECHO %date% %time% :  errorlevel is %errorlevel% >> %report_dir%\%computername%.txt
        IF %errorlevel% EQU 1 (
            ECHO %date% %time% : String found >> %report_dir%\%computername%.txt

            GOTO:copy_log
        )

    )

    ENDLOCAL

Raymond did you mean that?:

SETLOCAL enabledelayedexpansion

    FOR %%G IN (*.txt) DO (
        find /i "My text string" "%%G"
        IF %errorlevel% (
            ECHO %date% %time% : String found >> %report_dir%\%computername%.txt

            GOTO:copy_log
        )

    )

    ENDLOCAL
share|improve this question
    
As noted in the documentation, you use exclamation points for delayed expansion and percent signs for immediate expansion. You're still using %ERRORLEVEL%, which will be expanded immediate. You want it delayed, so you need !ERRORLEVEL!. Or you can just avoid the entire problem by saying IF ERRORLEVEL 1. – Raymond Chen Aug 21 '11 at 20:30
up vote 4 down vote accepted

I prefer to make For loops call branches. It prevents variable expansion problems:

For %%G In (*.txt) Do Call :ScanFile "%%G"
Exit /B

:ScanFile
Find /i "My text string" "%~1"
If %ErrorLevel%==1 (
    Echo %date% %time% : String found >> %report_dir%\%computername%.txt
    Goto :CopyLog
)
Exit /B

:CopyLog
...
Exit /B
share|improve this answer
    
This is the most easy solution. Thanks. – Dean Aug 25 '11 at 6:09

%ERRORLEVEL% is being expanded too soon. You can just avoid the problem entirely by using:

IF ERRORLEVEL 1

Or for further details, see this explanation of "delayed environment variable expansion" from the SET /? help text:

Finally, support for delayed environment variable expansion has been added. This support is always disabled by default, but may be enabled/disabled via the /V command line switch to CMD.EXE. See CMD /?

Delayed environment variable expansion is useful for getting around the limitations of the current expansion which happens when a line of text is read, not when it is executed. The following example demonstrates the problem with immediate variable expansion:

    set VAR=before
    if "%VAR%" == "before" (
        set VAR=after
        if "%VAR%" == "after" @echo If you see this, it worked
    )

would never display the message, since the %VAR% in BOTH IF statements is substituted when the first IF statement is read, since it logically includes the body of the IF, which is a compound statement. So the IF inside the compound statement is really comparing "before" with "after" which will never be equal. Similarly, the following example will not work as expected:

    set LIST=
    for %i in (*) do set LIST=%LIST% %i
    echo %LIST%

in that it will NOT build up a list of files in the current directory, but instead will just set the LIST variable to the last file found. Again, this is because the %LIST% is expanded just once when the FOR statement is read, and at that time the LIST variable is empty. So the actual FOR loop we are executing is:

    for %i in (*) do set LIST= %i

which just keeps setting LIST to the last file found.

Delayed environment variable expansion allows you to use a different character (the exclamation mark) to expand environment variables at execution time. If delayed variable expansion is enabled, the above examples could be written as follows to work as intended:

    set VAR=before
    if "%VAR%" == "before" (
        set VAR=after
        if "!VAR!" == "after" @echo If you see this, it worked
    )

Again, this is because the %LIST% is expanded just once when the FOR statement is read, and at that time the LIST variable is empty. So the actual FOR loop we are executing is:

    for %i in (*) do set LIST= %i

which just keeps setting LIST to the last file found.

Delayed environment variable expansion allows you to use a different character (the exclamation mark) to expand environment variables at execution time. If delayed variable expansion is enabled, the above examples could be written as follows to work as intended:

    set VAR=before
    if "%VAR%" == "before" (
        set VAR=after
        if "!VAR!" == "after" @echo If you see this, it worked
    )

    set LIST=
    for %i in (*) do set LIST=!LIST! %i
    echo %LIST%
share|improve this answer

As Raymond says you're evaluating %ERRORLEVEL% for the echo, which will almost always ( never say never ) return 0.

Something along the lines of the following will do better:

FOR %%G IN (*.txt) DO (
    find /i "My text string" "%%G"
    SET error = %errorlevel% 
    ECHO %date% %time% :  errorlevel is %errorl% >> %report_dir%\%computername%.txt
    IF %error% EQU 1 (
        ECHO %date% %time% : String found >> %report_dir%\%computername%.txt
        GOTO:copy_log
    )
)
share|improve this answer

I had the same problem while looping through registry keys/values, and came to this post. My "reg query" always had ERRORLEVEL 0 in a for loop.

Here's my solution:

for %%s in (%ToBeUninstalled%) do ( REG QUERY "%KEY64%\%%s" | find /i "UninstallString" > NUL && (msiexec.exe /x %%s /qb) || (echo Software not installed) )

KEY64 being HKLM\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Uninstall

share|improve this answer

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