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I'm trying to use scala parallel collections to implement some cpu-intensive task, I've wanted to abstract the way the algorithm can be executed (sequentially, parallel or even distributed), but the code dosn't work as I would suspect and I have no idea what am I doing wrong.

The way I wanted to abstract this problem is mocked below:

// just measures time a block of code runs
def time(block: => Unit) : Long = {
  val start = System.currentTimeMillis
  block
  val stop = System.currentTimeMillis
  stop - start
}

// "lengthy" task
def work = {
  Thread.sleep(100)
  println("done")
  1
}

import scala.collection.GenSeq


abstract class ContextTransform {
  def apply[T](genSeq: GenSeq[T]): GenSeq[T]
}

object ParContextTransform extends ContextTransform {
  override def apply[T](genSeq: GenSeq[T]): GenSeq[T] = genSeq.par
}

// this works as expected
def callingParDirectly = {
  val range = (1 to 10).par

  // make sure we really got a ParSeq
  println(range) 
  for (i <- range) yield work
}

// this doesn't 
def callingParWithContextTransform(contextTransform: ContextTransform) = {
  val range = contextTransform(1 to 10)

  // make sure we really got a ParSeq
  println(range)
  for (i <- range) yield work
}

The result from the interpreter:

scala> time(callingParDirectly)
ParRange(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10)
done
// ...
done
res20: Long = 503

scala> time(callingParWithContextTransform(ParContextTransform))
ParRange(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10)
done
// ...
done
res21: Long = 1002

My first bet was that the collection doesn't split properly and the println's of "done" indeed suggest that... but the above code works well if I don't yield anything (just run the work method).

I can't understand why the callingParWithContextTransform method doesn't work like callingParDirectly; what am I missing?

share|improve this question
    
What version of Scala are you using? This looks like one bug that was previously reported. –  Daniel C. Sobral Aug 21 '11 at 17:28
    
I can reproduce this with 2.9.1.RC3. –  Kipton Barros Aug 21 '11 at 17:31
    
I'm using 2.9.1 RC3. –  Bartosz Witkowski Aug 21 '11 at 17:35
    
I thought the bug was closed on trunk, but, as one can see, it isn't. Good thing I did not blithely state it has been fixed. :-) Though I confess the only reason I did not say so was that 2.9.1 is not out yet -- I thought it was fixed there. –  Daniel C. Sobral Aug 21 '11 at 17:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Possible culprit: SI-4843.

share|improve this answer
    
Good catch!.... –  Kipton Barros Aug 21 '11 at 17:42
    
Thanks! I wasn't sure if this was a bug or my error. –  Bartosz Witkowski Aug 21 '11 at 17:45

Daniel Sobral is right, this is a known bug. I can reproduce your results with Scala 2.9.1.RC3, but it's fixed in trunk. Here's a simplified version that demonstrates the slowdown:

  // just measures time a block of code runs
  def time(block: => Unit) : Long = {
      val start = System.currentTimeMillis
      block
      val stop = System.currentTimeMillis
      stop - start
  }

  // "lengthy" task
  def work = {
      Thread.sleep(100)
      1
  }

  def run() {
    import scala.collection.GenSeq

    print("Iterating over ParRange: ")
    println(time(for (i <- (1 to 10).par) yield work))

    print("Iterating over GenSeq: ")
    println(time(for (i <- (1 to 10).par: GenSeq[Int]) yield work))
  }

  run()

The output I get on 2.9.1.RC3 is

Iterating over ParRange: 202
Iterating over GenSeq: 1002

but on a nightly build of 2.10, both versions run in about 200ms.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, I guess I'll start looking into the nighties –  Bartosz Witkowski Aug 21 '11 at 17:44

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