Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying out Java 7's ThreadLocalRandom and see that it is generating exactly the same random numbers across multiple threads.

Here is my code, in which I create 5 threads and each thread prints out 5 random numbers:

//5 threads
for(int i = 0; i < 5 ; i++) {
    final Thread thread = new Thread() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            System.out.print(Thread.currentThread().getName()+":");

            //each thread prints 5 random numbers
            for(int j = 0 ; j < 5; j++) {
                final int random = ThreadLocalRandom.current().nextInt(1,100);
                System.out.print(random + ",");
            }
            System.out.println();
        }
    };
    thread.start();
    thread.join();
}

Output:

Thread-0:1,93,45,75,29,
Thread-1:1,93,45,75,29,
Thread-2:1,93,45,75,29,
Thread-3:1,93,45,75,29,
Thread-4:1,93,45,75,29,

Why am I getting the same random numbers for each thread and for every execution of the program?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Seems like there's an open bug regarding this issue. See here and here

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Nifty things bugs are –  Matt Aug 21 '11 at 17:20
1  
The bug has been solved in the Update 2 of JDK7. Download here: oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/downloads/… –  jopasserat Feb 5 '12 at 22:34
add comment

googling for the "ThreadLocalRandom source" gave me http://www.assembla.com/code/scala-eclipse-toolchain/git/nodes/src/forkjoin/scala/concurrent/forkjoin/ThreadLocalRandom.java

long/short of it: it uses a ThreadLocal<ThreadLocalRandom> which calls the no-arg constructor for construction

that no-arg constructor is

/**
 * Constructor called only by localRandom.initialValue.
 * We rely on the fact that the superclass no-arg constructor
 * invokes setSeed exactly once to initialize.
 */
ThreadLocalRandom() {
    super();
}

the no-arg super in Random calls this(long) with a unique seed

HOWEVER that constructor does

public Random(long seed) {
    this.seed = new AtomicLong(initialScramble(seed));
}

i.e. not the expected behavior from documentation

and ThreadLocalRandom doesn't/can't use the private seed

share|improve this answer
add comment

Isn't this because the threads are being created at roughly the same time and thus getting seeded the same value from the timer? I was under the impression that was how that worked, though I may be mistaken.

share|improve this answer
    
It's not the same time, there is a big time difference - each thread is created only after the previous thread was terminated. –  MByD Aug 21 '11 at 16:39
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.