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Why can't I do this:

var fooElement, barElements;
if(fooElement = document.getElementById('foo') && barElements = fooElement.getElementsByTagName('bar') && barElements[0] && barElements[0].onclick)
{
    console.log(barElements[0].onclick);
}

This won't work either:

var foo, bar;
if(foo = true && bar = true)
{
    console.log('yay');
}
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2 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Try this (it should give you a clue):

var foo, bar;
if((foo = true) && (bar = true))
{
    console.log('yay');
}
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1  
The precedence by default are to put the assignment last, so that all of the && statements are calculated first. This is easy to see when you mistakenly use = rather than ==, and makes sense if you consider the more common use of the combinations of = and &&. –  Schroedingers Cat Aug 21 '11 at 17:25
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Check Operator Precedence,Use

if((foo = true) && (bar = true))
{
    alert(foo);
}

UPD: Don't forget that following code will not set bar to true because && is Short Circuit operator

if((foo = false) && (bar = true))
{
    alert(foo);
}

Sample

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