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I thought if statements weren't supposed to contain assignment operators but rather the comparison operators (==, ===) but this works perfectly. Why?

var foo = true,
    bar = true;
if (foo = true) {
    console.log('foo is true');
}

I was taught that this wouldn't work but I just found out that it does.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

From the ES5.1 specification (12.5)

IfStatement :
    if ( Expression ) Statement  else Statement
    if ( Expression ) Statement

Any valid expression can be placed inside an if.

foo = true is an expression and it evaluates to true.

To avoid bugs like writing = instead of == in the future write it like

if (true = foo) {

}

Which will throw a assignment error since you can't assign values to literal values like true

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+1 for embracing errors and using them to your advantage instead of trying to hide them in the closet as is sometimes recommended. –  user113716 Aug 21 '11 at 17:55
    
@patrick_dw why did you stop lurking on chat.SO :( Who else am I supposed to ask the Really hard questions to. –  Raynos Aug 21 '11 at 18:27
    
Raynos: You ask awesome questions. I've learned as much from your questions as from your excellent answers. Not much time to chat, but I'll stop by and say hi sometime. –  user113716 Aug 21 '11 at 18:56

What you're actually doing, is still comparing:

if ((foo = true) == true) ...

This is an 'abbreviation' for:

foo = true;
if (foo == true) ...

So it does make sense =)!

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jslint.com gives an error though. –  zengr Aug 21 '11 at 17:31
3  
@zengr: jslint isn't law. –  Andrew Moore Aug 21 '11 at 17:34
2  
@Andrew, being foo = 'Hello World;' and comparing it against true will yield false (when the type of one of the operands is boolean, both are converted to Number, e.g.: '1' == true), I think you meant if (foo). Also agree, jslint isn't law, it's just the personal view (some times quite authoritative) of an individual about the language. :) –  CMS Aug 21 '11 at 17:39

The assignment is evaluated to true, beacuse JavaScript returns the value that it sets the variable to.

var foo = true,
    bar = true;
if (foo = true) {
    console.log('foo is true');
}

becomes:

var foo = true,
    bar = true;
if (true) {
    console.log('foo is true');
}

which passes the if. Note that setting to false would not work, because the conditional would evaluate to false which does not pass the if.

Specification about if:

if ( Expression ) Statement

You are using the assignment expression:

AssignmentExpression : ConditionalExpression LeftHandSideExpression AssignmentOperator AssignmentExpression

The = is specified as:

Simple Assignment ( = )

The production AssignmentExpression : LeftHandSideExpression = AssignmentExpression is evaluated as follows:

...

2 . Let rref be the result of evaluating AssignmentExpression.

3 . Let rval be GetValue(rref).

...

6. Return rval.

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+1 Nice answer. –  user113716 Aug 21 '11 at 17:54

Tragically, you are in fact assigning foo to true. :)

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