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I'm using pure html5 sliders as such:

<div>Brush Size:<input id="brush_size" type="range" value="10" min="1" max="100"/></div>
<div>Opacity: <input id="opacity" type="range" value="0.8" step="0.01" min="0.01" max="1.00"/></div>

Then saving the values into localStorage onChange:

$("#brush_size").change(function(){
  localStorage['brush_size']=this.value; 
});
$("#opacity").change(function(){
  localStorage['opacity']=this.value; 
});

After changes, on the next page load I would like to see the current localStorage values, instead of the html hardcoded values. What's the best way of doing this?

I suppose I could set the slider's value to the localStorage values during page load using jQuery... is this the best-practices way of doing it?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just add this to your code

$("#brush_size").val(localStorage['brush_size']);
$("#opacity").val(localStorage['opacity']);
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very simple. I chained that to my existing jQuery selector and it works. Thanks. –  sketchfemme Aug 21 '11 at 19:02

This should suffice:

$(function ()
{
    var ids = ['brush_size', 'opacity' /* etc */],
        id,
        value;

    for (var i=0; i<ids.length; i++)
    {
        id = ids[i];
        value = localStorage[id];
        if (typeof value !== 'undefined')
        {
            $('#'+id).val(value);
        }
    }
});

Side note: you should probably be using $(this).val() instead of this.value in the change callbacks, and you can make that code more concise overall:

$('#brush_size, #opacity').change(function ()
{
    localStorage[this.id] = $(this).val();
});

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/mattball/G59QH/ (courtesy of @David)

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Made a fiddle based on your answer: jsfiddle.net/2RmE3/10 –  David Ipsen Aug 21 '11 at 18:45
    
thanks. I used this.value instead of $(this).val() because I figured there is no reason to invoke jQuery wrapping just to get the value. –  sketchfemme Aug 21 '11 at 19:01
    
@sketch AFAIK .val() is not equivalent to .value. As I understand it, the value attribute only contains the initial value of the input. If the input value changes, .value will only ever contain the initial input value. developer.mozilla.org/en/HTML/Element/input#attr-value –  Matt Ball Aug 21 '11 at 19:15

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