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I cant seem to figure out why I keep getting this buggy output.

Input file:

ff1
ff2
ff3
ff10
ff11
ff20
ff21
ff23
gb20
gb10
gh23

Output File:

FF01
FF02
FF03
FF010
FF011
FF020
FF021
FF023
GB020
GB010
GH023

Code:

import os
import sys

#directory is the directory we will work from
directory = "C:\\Users\\user\\Desktop"
os.chdir(directory)

renameWhat = ["ff", "gb", "gh"]

oldFile = open("New Text Document.txt")
buffer = oldFile.read()

for item in renameWhat:
    for i in range(0, 50):
        if i < 10:
            buffer = buffer.replace(item + str(i), item.upper() + "0" + str(i))
        else:
            buffer = buffer.replace(item + str(i), item.upper() + str(i))

outFile = open("test.txt", "w")
outFile.write(buffer)
outFile.close()
oldFile.close()

What needs to happen:

I'm trying to replace ff to uppercase (done), then I need to add zero's to all numbers that are less than or equal to 9. So I think that if i is less than 10 should be good enough; but it's not because it's adding zeroes to everything over 9. I have tried with len(str(i)) to make sure it's only of length one, but that still does not work; what am I missing?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The reason your original solution doesn't work is that it isn't checking that it's matching a whole line/word/number. So for instance after replacing ff1 with FF01 your buffer is now:

FF01
ff2
ff3
FF010
FF011
ff20
ff21
ff23
gb20
gb10
gh23
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Cant believe I missed such a rudimentary error; yet not so obvious bug. I just added the file extensions to fix it. Thanks –  nobody Aug 21 '11 at 23:15
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Here is a simple solution:

with open("New Text Document.txt") as oldFile:
    with open("test.txt", "w") as outFile:
        for line in oldFile:
            start, end = line[:2], line[2:]
            outfile.write(start.upper() + end.strip().zfill(2) + '\n')

If you only want to uppercase specific prefixes:

with open("New Text Document.txt") as oldFile:
    with open("test.txt", "w") as outFile:
        for line in oldFile:
            start, end = line[:2], line[2:]
            if start in renameWhat:
                start = start.upper()
            outfile.write(start + end.strip().zfill(2) + '\n')
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1  
don't you mean line[:2] etc instead of buffer? –  machine yearning Aug 21 '11 at 19:32
    
yeah, thanks, renamed stuff only partially –  agf Aug 21 '11 at 19:32
    
np you just barely beat me to it! –  machine yearning Aug 21 '11 at 19:33
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Just use the zfill string method:

>>> str(1).zfill(2)
'01'
>>> str(10).zfill(2)
'10'
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That didn't work, it's still appending zeroes. –  nobody Aug 21 '11 at 23:03
    
That's a direct paste from a python prompt. And I believe you mean prepending. –  Ross Patterson Aug 22 '11 at 1:58
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import re
a = """ff1
ff2
ff3
ff10
ff11
ff20
ff21
ff23
gb20
gb10
gh23
"""

regex = re.compile('([a-zA-Z]*)([0-9]*)\n')
b = ""
for i in regex.findall(a):
    if i[0] in ['ff','gb','gh']:
        b+=i[0].upper()
    else:
        b+=i[0]
    if int(i[1]) < 10:
        b+= "0"
    b+= i[1]+"\n"
print b

Result:

FF01
FF02
FF03
FF10
FF11
FF20
FF21
FF23
GB20
GB10
GH23
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No need for a regex for something this simple -- it's what the built in string methods are for. –  agf Aug 21 '11 at 19:38
    
@agf: True. But then again it's simple enough it doesn't really matter –  Robus Aug 21 '11 at 19:39
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