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A good friend of mine found and gave me a book on intel 80x86 assembly coding. One rather large fact that the books skips over is what program you should use to code with. Any suggestions?

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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Depending on your platform, you may be interested in gas, yasm, nasm, or masm. Most Linux systems should have one of the first three in their package management system, and the fourth, the Microsoft Macro Assembler, is free on the internet.

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PCASM is a free text book that you may wish to consider as a companion to your friend's book. It is written by Dr Carter, a university professor. It uses real code and teaches you how to compile with NASM. It also covers how to integrate with C/C++ libraries. Its a great book and teaches you some of the internals of C++ code. NASM is a great way to go if you want portability.

In College I learned from Irvine's Intel Assembly Book. The book covers the MASM compiler. I found this a little easier to learn from, unfortunately, the book is not free.

I would use PCASM as a companion book. Its fairly short and covers some interesting topics as I mentioned.

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You could try the open source GNU Assembler: http://www.gnu.org/s/binutils/

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An open source alternative is the flat assembler, FASM.

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Could perhaps someone enlighten me why it could be that I received two downvotes on this? If I made some sort of faux pas, I'll just repeat it if I don't know why. –  Jens Björnhager Aug 22 '11 at 21:37
    
Strangely I received the same two downvotes on my answer. Probably was automated or malicious. –  Jeremy Salwen May 20 '12 at 7:51
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