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I borrowed the script used by SteamCalculator.com and wanted to modify it slightly to grab not just the price of the games on Steam, but the sale prices as well (if they exist)

The code was extremely straight-forward and easy enough to read. To retrieve the price he looks at the HTML from the steampowered.com search feature, pulls out everything between <div class=\"col search_price\"> and </div>, then runs the following sub-routine:

sub formPrice($)
{
    my $price = shift;

    if($price =~ m/(\d+)(?:\.|,)(\d{2})/)
    {
        return $1.$2;
    }
    else
    {
        return 0;
    }
}

The price is able to take one of 4 forms, depending on the country code you are looking for prices in and whether or not the game is on sale. These four forms are:

$9.99
<span><strike>$9.99</strike></span><br>$8.99
9,99£
<span><strike>9.99£</strike></span><br>8,99£

As you can see, regardless of which form the price takes his script will grab the very first instance of (\d+) (first group of digits, returning 9 in every case) as well as the (\d{2}) (group of 2 digits) following \.|, (dot or comma). When these are combined the sub-routine always returns 999, regardless of which of the four formats the price has.

I've been trying to find a way to modify this sub-routine to return 999 in cases 1 and 3, but return 899 in cases 2 and 4. So far I have tried:

1:

if((reverse $price) =~ m/(\d+)(?:\.|,)(\d{2})/g){
    return $2.$1;
}

2:

if($price =~ m/.*?(\d+)(?:\.|,)(\d{2})/g){
    return $1.$2;
}

3:

if($price =~ m/.*?(\d+)(?:\.|,)(\d{2})$/){
    return $1.$2;
}

The first returned prices such as 9199 for $19.99. The second the .*? was still being greedy and it was returning 999 for $19.99. The third returned 0 in cases 3 and 4 (dealing with euros)

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Anchoring the end as Flimzy suggests is the easiest solution.

I'm curious what you were trying to accomplish with your second attempt:

if($price =~ m/.*?(\d+)(?:\.|,)(\d{2})/g){
    return $1.$2;
}

Adding the g doesn't do anything particularly useful in this case. Adding .* (not .*?) to the beginning does get you the last match instead of the first, but you do need to guard against the match starting later than you want, e.g.:

if ( $price =~ m/.*\b(\d+)(?:\.|,)(\d{2})/ ) {
    return $1.$2;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I thought they /g may be necessary to ignore the first match, and the .*? I thought was supposed to be a non-greedy star (grab until the pattern after it is matched)? I'll try your solution –  stevendesu Aug 21 '11 at 20:36
    
m/.*\b(\d+)(?:\.|,)(\d{2})/ worked perfectly. The database now has all the normal and sale prices. Thank you. Not sure why Flimzy's m/(\d+)(?:\.|,)(\d{2})£?$/ didn't work. –  stevendesu Aug 21 '11 at 20:43
1  
non-greedy star means match any number of non-newlines, preferring to match fewer over more. here, you want to prefer matching more over fewer. –  ysth Aug 21 '11 at 20:47
    
I'd suspect you have an encoding mismatch or html entities prevening £? from matching when you expect. –  ysth Aug 21 '11 at 20:49
1  
/g matches in scalar context will still stop after the first match, unless run more than once. –  ysth Aug 21 '11 at 20:50

This seems to work for me:

m/(\d+)(?:\.|,)(\d{2})£?\s*$/
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For some reason after testing this all of the sale prices in my database were 0. I tried the following: if($price =~ m/(\d+)(?:\.|,)(\d{2})£?$/){ printf('got here'); die();} and the script never died. So $price =~ m/(\d+)(?:\.|,)(\d{2})£?$/ is returning false. Any clues? –  stevendesu Aug 21 '11 at 20:31
    
Then your input is different than in your question... I copied your 4 prices into my test script, and they all worked. Maybe you have trailing whitespace after your price strings. I've updated the answer to account for possible whitespace. –  Flimzy Aug 21 '11 at 20:33
    
I worried as much. As I said, the HTML comes from steampowered.com and the script was made by someone else. I'm only modifying one sub-routine. I output $price to a database to determine the different forms it could take, although trailing spaces and non-printing characters might be ruining everything. –  stevendesu Aug 21 '11 at 20:37
    
Just tried the modified solution and it's filling the database with 0's as well. I'm really not sure what's going on, sorry. –  stevendesu Aug 21 '11 at 20:44

Here's a way to do it with the global option:

sub price {
    my $str = shift;
    my @nums = $str =~ /(\d+)[.,]*(\d{2})/g;
    return 0 unless @nums;
    return (join '', @nums[-2,-1]);
}

The global /g returns all the matches in a list. The sub returns 0 if no matches are found, else returns the last two, joined into a string. Using [.,]* instead of a lookahead.

Update (based on comments):

A slightly faster solution: Reading from the end of the string, and using the string directly instead of making a copy.

sub price {
    return (join '', $_[0] =~ /(\d+)[.,](\d{2})\D*$/);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Very interesting answer. Although I can't help but assume it would run a bit slower than ysth's answer. I may try to see if it's really faster or slower. –  stevendesu Aug 21 '11 at 22:03
    
If speed is important, you can perhaps shave off a bit by sacrificing readability: return (join '', $_[0] =~ /(\d+)[.,](\d{2})\D*$/); I.e.: don't copy the string, and read only from the end of the string. –  TLP Aug 21 '11 at 22:13
    
Speed isn't that important (the script already completes in about 50-70 seconds and it will be run once a night around midnight once I have it complete), although I see no reason to change a working program if it would mean losing performance. I'll try return (join '', $_[0] =~ /(\d+)[.,](\d{2})\D*$/); and see what happens. –  stevendesu Aug 21 '11 at 22:16
    
Interestingly it only shaved about a third of a second off of the run-time, if anything. I did watch the script as it's running, though, and inputting the information into the database is taking FAR longer than anything else. I may look into ways to optimize MySQL in the future, but for now I have a working script. No reason to break it. –  stevendesu Aug 21 '11 at 22:20
    
As long as you have reasonably short strings, and/or don't call them too often, I doubt there is really any need to optimize this particular sub much. –  TLP Aug 21 '11 at 22:32

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