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I am just doing some practice from one of my books, and I was curious about why I am getting the following error in eclipse:

Type mismatch: cannot convert from type DoublyLinkedList.Node<E> to DoublyLinkedList.Node<E>

Code:

import java.util.Iterator;
    import java.util.ListIterator;
    import java.util.NoSuchElementException;


public class DoublyLinkedList<E extends Comparable<E>> implements Iterable<E>{

 private int size = 0;
 private Node<E> head;
 private Node<E> tail;

/** Returns a list iterator object for the list at 
 * the specified index
 */

 public DoublyLinkedList(){


}



private static class Node<E> {

    Node<E> next = null;
    Node<E> prev = null;
    E data;

    public Node(E dataItem){
        data = dataItem;
    }

    public Node(E dataItem, Node<E> previous, Node<E> nextNode){
        this(dataItem);
        prev = previous;
        next = nextNode;
    }

}


private class MyListIter<E> implements ListIterator<E>{

    private Node<E> lastReturned; // a link reference to the last item that was returned
    private Node<E> nextItem; // a link reference to the next item in the list
    /** The index of the current position */ 
    private int index = 0;

    public MyListIter(int pos){
        if (pos < 0 || pos > size)
            throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException("Invalid index: " + index);
        lastReturned = null;
        if (pos == size){
            index = size;
            nextItem = null;
        } else { // otherwise we will start at the beginning of the list, and loop until the position in the argument
            nextItem = head; // ERROR
            for (index = 0; index < pos; index++){
                nextItem = nextItem.next; // next item will always reference the list node that is called by the next method
            }

        }
    }

    @Override
    public void add(E element) {
        if (head == null){
            Node<E> newNode = new Node<E>(element);
            head = newNode; // ERROR
            tail = head;
        }


    }
    @Override
    public boolean hasNext() {
        return nextItem != null; // just checks to make sure there is a node following the current node
    }
    @Override
    public boolean hasPrevious() {
        return (nextItem == null && size != 0) || nextItem.prev != null;
    }
    @Override
    public E next() {
        if (!hasNext())
            throw new NoSuchElementException("There is no node at that location");
        lastReturned = nextItem;
        nextItem = nextItem.next;
        index++;
        return lastReturned.data;
    }
    @Override
    public int nextIndex() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return 0;
    }
    @Override
    public E previous() {
        if (!hasPrevious())
            throw new NoSuchElementException();
        if (nextItem == null) // the iterator is at the end of the list
            nextItem = tail; // therefore, the nextItem is at the tail, so the previous is the tail. ERROR HERE TOO
        else
            nextItem = nextItem.prev;
        lastReturned = nextItem;
        index--;
        return lastReturned.data;
    }
    @Override
    public int previousIndex() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return 0;
    }
    @Override
    public void remove() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub

    }
    @Override
    public void set(E arg0) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub

    }



}


@Override
public Iterator<E> iterator() {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    return null;
}


}

I commented where exactly I am getting the error in 3 different locations. If you can provide any feedback, I'd appreciate it. My book doesn't address it and I have searched around and can't really seem to get the answer i'm looking for.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You've declared two different generic types: E (for Node) and E extends Comparable<E> (for DoublyLinkedList).

The main issue here is probably MyListIter, which is a non-static inner class and as such automatically inherits DoublyLinkedList's definition of E. Because it inherits the definition of E, you should just be declaring it as

private class MyListIter implements ListIterator<E>

but you've made it MyListIter<E>, which is redefining E to something different than the E that DoublyLinkedList users (implicit E extends Object vs. E extends Comparable<E>).

I think Node should work as-is since it is a nested class (with the static keyword) and doesn't inherit the definition of E from DoublyLinkedList. However, it'd probably make sense here to declare it as a non-static inner class of DoublyLinkedList (private class Node) the same as MyListIter.

Also, you should probably allow E to be a type that is a subtype of some type that implements Comparable by declaring it as E extends Comparable<? super E>.

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+1 good point about E extends Comparable<? super E> –  Paul Bellora Aug 21 '11 at 20:29
    
Wow. I never would have known. I think that fixed everything. This book really is poorly written. I was under the impression that if DoublyLinkedList is type <E>, that everything within that class should be <E> also, making them all the same type. But I guess its not? –  TMGunter Aug 21 '11 at 20:51
2  
@TMGunter: If you declare an inner class without the static keyword, instances of that inner class all must belong to a specific instance of the containing class. For that reason, they automatically have access to the generic type(s) declared for the containing class (E in this case). I'm actually not sure that Node is a problem here since it has the static keyword and is therefore a nested class that doesn't inherit the definition of E. MyListIter is probably the real issue here, since it does inherit the definition of E but also declares its own (conflicting) definition. –  ColinD Aug 21 '11 at 21:00
    
Thank you. That actually clarified things quite a bit. I am actually understanding generics, nested (static and non-static) classes, and inheriting types much more now. –  TMGunter Aug 22 '11 at 18:06

It looks like you're getting this error because you're redefining E in your Node nested class. Since it's a static nested class, it has no direct relationship to the parent class DoublyLinkedList. It might make more sense to make the class non-static so that E continues to have meaning within it. For example:

private class Node {

Node next = null;
Node prev = null;
E data;

...

EDIT: as ColinD noted, MyListIter should similarly not redeclare E as a type parameter. Changing this like with Node should fix the issue.

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When I do that it complains about my Node constructor not being generic and says, "The type DoublyLinkedList<E>.Node is not generic; it cannot be parameterized with arguments <E>" –  TMGunter Aug 21 '11 at 20:33
    
did you make sure to change all Node<E> types to Node? –  Paul Bellora Aug 21 '11 at 20:35
    
Yeah. Node<E> is now type Node. I also used Colin's suggestion to make E a subtype of ?. My book doesn't really go into that at all, but I think I understand what it means. I had to look it up. It makes a lot more sense that I make Node a private nested class, and remove its static nature. I was trying to follow my book, and I think it just really isn't teaching it very well. –  TMGunter Aug 21 '11 at 21:01

ColinD is right (+1).

To understand what's going on, imagine not using the same formal type parameter 3 times, but E for DoublyLinkedList, F for Node and G for MyListIter. Then the error message would say Type mismatch: cannot convert from type DoublyLinkedList.Node<E> to DoublyLinkedList.Node<G>. The solution is the one ColinD suggested. If you want, you can leave Node<F> static, with the fix all instances will have the same actual type parameter.

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So I can really define the static class "Node" any type I really want to? When I use a reference to Node<E> in the top-level class, even though Node is defined as Node<F>, it will inherit the type "E" from the parent class? That is what i'm gathering. If I do not make it a static inner class, I should not define the Node with a type-parameter because the type "E" would be inherited from the top-most class? –  TMGunter Aug 22 '11 at 18:02
    
@TMGunter: Yes and yes. –  DaveFar Aug 22 '11 at 22:43
    
For clarity: in public class DoublyLinkedList<E ... you define the formal type parameter E, and then you can use E in the body and any inner class. Therefore, you can also declare a private Node<E> head;, just the same way as for instance private Node<String> head; or private List<E> head;. Just as the formal type parameter for List is totally independent of your E and could be F or anything else, the formal type parameter of your private static class Node<F> is. That's why I suggested using different letters, to avoid confusion. –  DaveFar Aug 22 '11 at 22:54

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