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Is it possible to wrap each word on HTML page with span element? I'm trying something like

/(\s*(?:<\/?\w+[^>]*>)|(\b\w+\b))/g

but results far from what I need.

Thanks in advance!

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6  
You really shouldn't parse HTML with regex –  Joseph Marikle Aug 21 '11 at 21:28
2  
You can't parse HTML with regex, only Chuck Norris can. stackoverflow.com/questions/1732348/… –  stewe Aug 21 '11 at 21:29
2  
Of course you can use regexes to parse HTML. In fact, some times you even should. However, Javascript has some of the most horrible regexes of any programming language anywhere. The XRegExp plugin helps, but it still sucks. It's easier to teach a pig to sing, and less annoying.Either do all Real™ work serverside where you can use a Real™ programming language, or else be prepared to improvise a 6-voice fugue for unaccompanied porcine chorus. –  tchrist Aug 22 '11 at 0:16
    
Thanks guys, it seems I need to look in a direction of getting all text nodes and working with them. –  Roman Aug 22 '11 at 7:45
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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well, I don't ask for the reason, you could do it like this:

function getChilds( nodes ) {
    var len = nodes.length;

    while( len-- ) {
        if( nodes[len].childNodes && nodes[len].childNodes.length ) {
            getChilds( nodes[len].childNodes );
        }

        var content = nodes[len].textContent || nodes[len].text;

        if( nodes[len].nodeType === 3 ) {
            var parent = nodes[len].parentNode,
                newstr = content.split(/\s+/).forEach(function( word ) {
                    var s = document.createElement('span');
                    s.textContent = word + ' ';

                    parent.appendChild(s);
                });

            parent.removeChild( nodes[len] );
        }
    };
}

getChilds( document.body.childNodes );

Even tho I have to admit I didn't test the code yet. That was just the first thing which came to my mind. Might be buggy or screw up completely, but for that case I know the gentle and kind stackoverflow community will kick my ass and downvote like hell :-p

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1  
Why this line: var each = Array.prototype.forEach;? there doesn't seem to be a point to it. –  Brock Adams Aug 22 '11 at 2:05
    
Yeah, first line is confusing, could you explain this? Anyway, with some modification this solved my problem. Thanks! –  Roman Aug 22 '11 at 7:54
    
@Brock: yay you're right. Thats a hangover from a further version. I'll remove it. –  jAndy Aug 22 '11 at 8:08
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You're going to have to get down to the "Text" nodes to make this happen. Without making it specific to a tag, you really to to traverse every element on the page, wrap it, and re-append it.

With that said, try something like what a garble post makes use of (less making fitlers for words with 4+ characters and mixing the letters up).

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1  
That was a fun topic, wasn't it? –  qwertymk Aug 21 '11 at 22:28
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To get all words between span tags from current page, you can use:

var spans = document.body.getElementsByTagName('span');
if (spans)
{
  for (var i in spans)
  {
    if (spans[i].innerHTML && !/[^\w*]/.test(spans[i].innerHTML))
    {
      alert(spans[i].innerHTML);
    }
  }
}
else
{
  alert('span tags not found');
}
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1  
My understanding is not to filter based on if they're already in a span, but to make every word itself get wrapped in a new span. ...maybe I'm misinterpreting? –  Brad Christie Aug 21 '11 at 22:22
    
I think you're correct Brad. –  Russ C Aug 21 '11 at 22:51
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You should probably start off by getting all the text nodes in the document, and working with their contents instead of on the HTML as a plain string. It really depends on the language you're working with, but you could usually use a simple XPath like //text() to do that.

In JavaScript, that would be document.evaluate('//text()', document.body, null, XPathResult.ORDERED_NODE_SNAPSHOT_TYPE, null), than iterating over the results and working with each text node separately.

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See demo

Here's how I did it, may need some tweaking...

var wrapWords = function(el) {
    var skipTags = { style: true, script: true, iframe: true, a: true },
        child, tag;

    for (var i = el.childNodes.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
        child = el.childNodes[i];
        if (child.nodeType == 1) {
            tag = child.nodeName.toLowerCase();
            if (!(tag in skipTags)) { wrapWords(child); }
        } else if (child.nodeType == 3 && /\w+/.test(child.textContent)) {
            var si, spanWrap;
            while ((si = child.textContent.indexOf(' ')) >= 0) {
                if (child != null && si == 0) {
                    child.splitText(1);
                    child = child.nextSibling;
                } else if (child != null) {
                    child.splitText(si);
                    spanWrap = document.createElement("span");
                    spanWrap.innerHTML = child.textContent;
                    child.parentNode.replaceChild(spanWrap, child);
                    child = spanWrap.nextSibling;
                }
            }
            if (child != null) {
                spanWrap = document.createElement("span");
                spanWrap.innerHTML = child.textContent;
                child.parentNode.replaceChild(spanWrap, child);
            }
        }
    }
};

wrapWords(document.body);

See demo

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