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I am trying to find the best way to display a huge number of messages per second. I developed the following program that generates random data which simulates a stream that has to be displayed in real time with no latancy.

The program shows 4 columns: Real timestamps, data timestamps, delayed time and message id. An Example:
00:00:00.002000 00:00:00.000000 00:00:00.000000 #1
00:00:00.592034 00:00:00.585000 00:00:00.585000 #2
00:00:01.653095 00:00:01.642000 00:00:01.057000 #3
00:00:01.692097 00:00:01.675000 00:00:00.033000 #4
00:00:01.698097 00:00:01.675000 00:00:00.000000 #5
00:00:01.698097 00:00:01.675000 00:00:00.000000 #6
00:00:01.698097 00:00:01.675000 00:00:00.000000 #7
00:00:01.698097 00:00:01.675000 00:00:00.000000 #8
00:00:01.698097 00:00:01.675000 00:00:00.000000 #9
00:00:01.698097 00:00:01.675000 00:00:00.000000 #10
...

For instance, Line #4 was "received" at second 1.675, it had a delay of 0.033 seconds from line #3 and this message was actually displayed at 1.692097. The first and the second column should be as close as possible. However, timers diverge when there are picks of data. While running the program, you can notice how the column 2 is being sticky because messages displayed at the same millisecond are drawn line by line instead of being displayed all at once. I do not know whether it is a hardware limitation or a bad implementation, but the test shows at the end how the time of the first column is several times higher than the time of the second. I know calculations and data displaying take some time but I think that the difference is too much. How can I match both timers? If I can't, how can I make them as close as possible?

Thank you very much for your time,

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <list>
#include <time.h>

#include <boost/date_time/posix_time/posix_time.hpp>
#include <boost/thread.hpp>

using namespace std;
using namespace boost::posix_time;

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    srand (time(NULL));
    int rmil, num=0; //Integers for generating random milliseconds and counting messages 
    time_duration snapshot, sum = milliseconds(0); //Sum of total message delais and its holding value

    struct message
    {
        time_duration delay;
        string print;
    } m;

    list<message> mlist; //List of messages

    //Simulating 30 seconds of data with peaks of volume. 

    //The first message is at time 0
    m.delay = milliseconds(0); num++;
    m.print = to_simple_string(sum)+"  00:00:00.000000  #"+boost::lexical_cast<std::string>(num);
    mlist.push_back(m);

    while(sum<seconds(30)) //Generating 30 seconds of data
    {
        if(rand()%100<10) // Probability to have a peak data volume
        {
                snapshot = sum;
                while(sum<snapshot+seconds(1)) //Generating messages for 1 second
                {
                    rmil = rand() % 100; //0.050 second delay between packs of messages
                    int mpm = rand() % 150; //Num of Message per millisecond

                    m.delay = milliseconds(rmil);
                    num++; sum += milliseconds(rmil);
                    m.print = to_simple_string(sum)+"  "+to_simple_string(m.delay)+"  #"+boost::lexical_cast<std::string>(num);
                    mlist.push_back(m); 
                    for(int n=0;n<mpm;n++) //Adding messages at the same millisecond
                    {
                        m.delay = milliseconds(0); num++;
                        m.print = to_simple_string(sum)+"  00:00:00.000000  #"+boost::lexical_cast<std::string>(num);
                        mlist.push_back(m); //Push message to the list
                    }
                }
        }
        else
        {
            rmil = rand() % 2000; //1 second delay (average) between messages, no peak volume
            m.delay = milliseconds(rmil); 
            num++; sum += milliseconds(rmil);
            m.print = to_simple_string(sum)+"  "+to_simple_string(m.delay)+"  #"+boost::lexical_cast<std::string>(num);
            mlist.push_back(m);
        }
    }

    //Displaying messages with delay
    list<message>::iterator it = mlist.begin();

    stringstream scrmsg;
    ptime ltime = microsec_clock::local_time(); //Record the local time
    while(it!=mlist.end())
    {
        if((*it).delay > boost::posix_time::milliseconds(0)) 
        {
            boost::this_thread::sleep((*it).delay); 
            cout << to_simple_string(microsec_clock::local_time()-ltime) << "  " <<(*it).print << endl;
            it++;
        }
        else //Group the messages at the same millisecond
        {
            while((*it).delay == boost::posix_time::milliseconds(0))
            {
                scrmsg << to_simple_string(microsec_clock::local_time()-ltime) << "  " << (*it).print << endl;
                it++;
            }
            cout << scrmsg.str();
            scrmsg.str("");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
@DeadMG: err, right, my bad... –  maerics Aug 21 '11 at 22:33

2 Answers 2

You could not match the timers.

There is no reliable way to time functions calls to happen in the same millisecond. Your operating system may need to pause the execution of your program to do calls with higher priority (in this case the console output for example).

share|improve this answer
    
No sir - it is most definitely possible to make multiple function calls in the same millisecond! –  maerics Aug 21 '11 at 22:22
    
In multiple threads, yeah, in theory, but time that. How would you do two cpu instructions at the same time or within a millisecond? Other process may need resources too? thats what you need to get timed to do different calls in the same millisecond, and there is no reliable way –  Thomas Berger Aug 21 '11 at 22:26
    
Nope, even in the same thread. A 3GHz processor can perform 9 instructions per nanosecond; that leaves a lot of room to do thousands (even tens or hundreds of thousands) of operations per millisecond. Do a little arithmetic to verify, or write a tight loop of C and see how many function calls you can crank out in 1ms... –  maerics Aug 21 '11 at 22:30
1  
@maerics: Not within the thread quantum. Your thread could be switched out. You can't guarantee such things. –  Puppy Aug 21 '11 at 22:31
    
right, but to time it in your program is the trick, i will update my answer - Done –  Thomas Berger Aug 21 '11 at 22:31

You're probably looking at the thread quantum. Even if the scheduler decides to let your thread run again immediately, it still has to pause it to decide that- and it may decide to allow other threads to run instead. There would be no way to actually make your program run within that kind of accuracy. This is especially true as console I/O is blocking, which will trivially throw off your times.

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