Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am wondering if there is a standard library function in Python which will rearrange the elements of a list like below:

a = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7]

function(a)

print a

a = [1,7,2,6,3,5,4]

It should get one element from beginning of original list, then one from end, then second from beginning and so on. Then rearrange the list.

Regards,

share|improve this question
6  
Why on earth would anyone have created this as a standard library function? Are you looking for a domain-specific languages for generating sestinas? – Henning Makholm Aug 21 '11 at 22:32
3  
That's a very specific way to reorder a list. I highly doubt there's a standard library function to do exactly that. Fortunately, you can just write one. – Samir Talwar Aug 21 '11 at 22:32
    
I'm pretty sure there is no standard function to do what you have asked. You could use list comps. it'd be pretty minimal – Lelouch Lamperouge Aug 21 '11 at 22:35
    
what is "list comps"? – alwbtc Aug 21 '11 at 22:37
5  
Python is a programming language, not a massive prebuilt collection of every conceivable program. – Glenn Maynard Aug 21 '11 at 22:41
up vote 9 down vote accepted

You could build a fast, memory efficient generator using itertools which does what you want:

from itertools import chain, izip

def reorder(a):
    gen = chain.from_iterable(izip(a, reversed(a)))
    for _ in a:
        yield next(gen)

>>> list(reorder(a))
<<< [1, 7, 2, 6, 3, 5, 4]

You'll find that itertools has a great collection of building blocks for creating your own efficient iterators. A slightly more succinct solution:

>>> list(chain.from_iterable(izip(a, reversed(a))))[:len(a)]
<<< [1, 7, 2, 6, 3, 5, 4]

List comprehensions are another really concise way to build lists:

>>> [x for t in zip(a, reversed(a)) for x in t][:len(a)]
<<< [1, 7, 2, 6, 3, 5, 4]

Finally here's a short one-liner just for fun:

>>> sum(zip(a, a[::-1]), ())[:len(a)]
<<< (1, 7, 2, 6, 3, 5, 4)
share|improve this answer
    
Nice! Why not gen = chain(*izip(a, reversed(a))), though? – Johnsyweb Aug 21 '11 at 23:55
1  
Yeah, that's better actually, since reversed returns an iterator. – zeekay Aug 22 '11 at 0:03
    
The first one is even readable. – JasonFruit Aug 22 '11 at 1:05
    
Yeah but after that I broke down :( – zeekay Aug 22 '11 at 1:06
    
Happens to the best of us. :-) – JasonFruit Aug 22 '11 at 1:07
>>> ((a+a[:0:-1])*len(a))[::len(a)][:len(a)]
[1, 7, 2, 6, 3, 5, 4]
share|improve this answer
1  
Astonishing. But (a+a[:0:-1])*len(a) has a length of 91 elements if len(a)==7, and a length of 19900 if len(a)==100 – eyquem Aug 22 '11 at 0:03
    
@eyquem, Of course it's not efficient, but this q did set off my homework radar – John La Rooy Aug 22 '11 at 20:14
    
@gnibbler: perfect, thanks. – alwbtc Feb 24 '12 at 14:44
for a in ([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9],
          [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8],
          [1,2,3,4],
          [1,2,3],
          [1,2,],
          [1],
          []):
    print a
    [ a.insert(i,a.pop()) for i in xrange(1,len(a)+1,2)]
    print a,'\n'

result

[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[1, 9, 2, 8, 3, 7, 4, 6, 5] 

[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
[1, 8, 2, 7, 3, 6, 4, 5] 

[1, 2, 3, 4]
[1, 4, 2, 3] 

[1, 2, 3]
[1, 3, 2] 

[1, 2]
[1, 2] 

[1]
[1] 

[]
[] 

Update 1

Comparing to zeekay's code:

from time import clock


n = 100000


te = clock()
for i in xrange(n):
    a = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20]
    [ a.insert(i,a.pop()) for i in xrange(1,len(a)+1,2)]
print clock()-te



from itertools import chain, izip
def reorder(a):
    gen = chain(*izip(a, reversed(a)))
    for _ in a:
        yield next(gen)

te = clock()
for i in xrange(n):
    a = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20]
    a = list(reorder(a)) 
print clock()-te

result

2.36667984339
5.00051766356

My method changes a in place

share|improve this answer

Of course in Python there is only ever one way to do things ;-):

def function(a):
    ret = []
    this_end, other_end = 0, -1
    while a:
        ret.append(a.pop(this_end))
        this_end, other_end = other_end, this_end
    return ret

a = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7]

print function(a)

For timings:

% python -m timeit 'def function(a):
quote>     ret = []
quote>     this_end, other_end = 0, -1
quote>     while a:
quote>         ret.append(a.pop(this_end))
quote>         this_end, other_end = other_end, this_end
quote>     return ret
quote>
quote> a = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7]
quote>
quote> print function(a)
quote> ' | tail
[1, 7, 2, 6, 3, 5, 4]
[1, 7, 2, 6, 3, 5, 4]
[1, 7, 2, 6, 3, 5, 4]
[1, 7, 2, 6, 3, 5, 4]
[1, 7, 2, 6, 3, 5, 4]
[1, 7, 2, 6, 3, 5, 4]
[1, 7, 2, 6, 3, 5, 4]
[1, 7, 2, 6, 3, 5, 4]
[1, 7, 2, 6, 3, 5, 4]
100000 loops, best of 3: 10.5 usec per loop
share|improve this answer

thanks all, I have written my own function:

def shake(list):
    """Gets a list and reorders the items,
       one from beginning, one from end"""
    #print "original list is: ", list
    new_list = []

    x = len(list) - 1
    y = len(list)/2

    for i in xrange(y):
        if list[i] not in new_list:
            new_list.append(list[i])
        if list[i+x] not in new_list:
            new_list.append(list[i+x])
        x -= 2

    if len(list)%2 == 1:
        new_list.append(list[y])

    #print "new list is: ", new_list 
    return new_list
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.