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I am currently trying to configure the Virtual Host (Subdomain) of my Apache HTTP Server so it can be accessed with another computer on my LAN. The current setup of Apache with PHP and MySQL works locally on the same physical machine.

So I have two Virtual Host setup (development and cms) running on a non-default port of 50080. The machine of the server have a IP of 10.0.0.10. From the same physical machine, I can access the two Virtual Host using:

development.localhost:50080
cms.localhost:50080

From a different physical machine, I can access the root of the server using:

10.0.0.10:50080

But I cannot or do not know how to access the Virtual Host from the different machine. I tried something like:

development.10.0.0.10:50080
cms.10.0.0.10:50080

But they do not seem to work.

Here's how my httpd-vhosts file looks like:

NameVirtualHost *:50080
<VirtualHost *:50080>
    DocumentRoot "C:/www/HTTP"
    ServerName localhost
</VirtualHost>

<VirtualHost *:50080>
    ServerAdmin administrator@development.localhost
    DocumentRoot "C:/www/HTTP/development"
    ServerName development.localhost
    ErrorLog "logs/development.localhost-error.log"
    CustomLog "logs/development.localhost-access.log" common
</VirtualHost>

I read some of the other post here and the Apache forum, but there's not exact case for this.

I was wondering how I can access the Virtual Host (Subdomain) from another machine and keep the same port if possible.

Thanks in advance

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4 Answers 4

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Ok, I figured it out, here are the configuration if anyone else is looking for this:

==================================================================================

Machine A (Apache HTTP Server): httpd-vhost:

NameVirtualHost *:50080

<VirtualHost *:50080>
    DocumentRoot "C:/www/HTTP"
    ServerName localhost
    ServerAlias alias <!-- Added -->
</VirtualHost>

<VirtualHost *:50080>
    ServerAdmin administrator@development.localhost
    DocumentRoot "C:/www/HTTP/development"
    ServerName development.localhost
    ServerAlias development.phoenix <!-- Added -->
    ErrorLog "logs/development.localhost-error.log"
    CustomLog "logs/development.localhost-access.log" common
</VirtualHost>

hosts:

127.0.0.1 development.localhost

127.0.0.1 alias
127.0.0.1 development.alias

==================================================================================

Machine B (Guest Machine): hosts:

10.0.0.10 alias
10.0.0.10 development.alias

From the second machine, you should be able to access with "alias" and "development.alias"

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2  
Many thanks for this, was a great help! A couple of side notes for anyone that's still having trouble with this: where "phoenix" is written above, I used alias and it worked (not sure why phoenix was used when alias is everywhere else...) Also You may need to create a rule for your local firewall on the port you are using before you see your website over the network. I had to create an exception for port 80 (I didn't use 50080) –  J.B Jul 22 '13 at 17:04
    
You could also add mod_proxy and then ProxyPass /dev development.localhost and ProxyReversePass /dev development.localhost and then use public-ip/dev –  y_nk Apr 14 at 22:27

I suggest making the following change (add the ServerAlias lines):

NameVirtualHost *:50080
<VirtualHost *:50080>
    DocumentRoot "C:/www/HTTP"
    ServerName localhost
    ServerAlias cms.myserver.com
</VirtualHost>

<VirtualHost *:50080>
    ServerAdmin administrator@development.localhost
    DocumentRoot "C:/www/HTTP/development"
    ServerName development.localhost 
    ServerAlias development.myserver.com
    ErrorLog "logs/development.localhost-error.log"
    CustomLog "logs/development.localhost-access.log" common
</VirtualHost>

Restart Apache to ensure the changes take effect.

Then on your second computer you need to add a custom dns entry for these new domain names. If it is Windows, edit the file c:\windows\system32\drivers\etc\hosts. If it is Linux, edit /etc/hosts. Either way add:

10.0.0.10 development.myserver.com
10.0.0.10 cms.myserver.com

Now on your second computer you should be able to access the following URLs:

http://development.myserver.com:50080
http://cms.myserver.com:50080
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I seem to be getting an error when trying to start Apache with the configuration you gave... –  YTKColumba Aug 21 '11 at 23:02
    
I am getting an error while trying to start Apache, so it seem to the configuration with the httpd-vhosts file. BTW, the first <VirtualHost> entry is pointing to the root of the directory, I did not add the "cms" entry since I figure it be the same as the "development" entry –  YTKColumba Aug 21 '11 at 23:07
    
What is the apache error in the log? –  JJ. Aug 23 '11 at 20:20

For Named Virtual Hosts you need to use a hostname or domainname to connect to you apache server. It does not work with ips.

You could insert an entry in your /etc/hosts on your second system.

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My hosts file on the Apache machine have the entry: 127.0.0.1 development.localhost The second machine have nothing yet, what should I add? –  YTKColumba Aug 21 '11 at 23:03
    
<ip of development server> development.server for example, and then add the ServerAlias development.server to your apache config. –  Thomas Berger Aug 21 '11 at 23:08

Unless I'm missing something, you'll need to either set up DNS entries, or add entries to the /etc/hosts file of each computer accessing the server.

localhost is an entry that exists in everyone's /etc/hosts file by default, always pointing to 127.0.0.1. Without adding a /etc/hosts entry, developer.localhost doesn't exist, and prefixing an ip address with a subdomain won't work at all.

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My hosts file on the Apache machine have the entry: 127.0.0.1 development.localhost The second machine have nothing yet, what should I add? –  YTKColumba Aug 21 '11 at 23:04
    
That would work, yes. –  Doug Kress Aug 21 '11 at 23:11

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