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I am going crazy with Objective C. Please look to the following code.

FirstViewController.h:

@interface FirstViewController : UIViewController {
    IBOutlet UITextView *textView;
    IBOutlet UIBarButtonItem *button;
    NSString* superString;
}

- (IBAction)buttonDown;

FirstViewController.m:

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    [super viewDidLoad];
    superString = [NSString stringWithFormat:"%@", @"A_super_string_file.txt"];
    [self buttonDown];
}

- (IBAction)buttonDown {
    NSError* err = nil;
    NSString* text = [NSString stringWithContentsOfFile:superString encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding error:&err];
    [textView setText:text];
}
  1. Run the application. A_super_string_file.txt successfully displayed in textView.
  2. Press the button. The application crashes because superString refers on the same address as in the step 1 but there is another variable or nothing on this address. Print Description on superString displays nothing or random other variable (may be even different type).

What happens? I am a skill developer but have no idea in this case. Thanks a lot for help!

UPDATE: Possibly, it's hidden autorelease in the work. But when it releases memory? On different moment every time or on some exact moment?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to retain superString.

[superString retain];

immediately after creating it.

and then release it in dealloc.

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Thanks, it's the best solution! –  Altaveron Aug 21 '11 at 23:56

NSString's +stringWithFormat: is autoreleasing. You need to retain it if you want it to stay around.

Properties are a good way to do this, because it cuts down how much memory management you need to worry about yourself.

.h

@interface FirstViewController : UIViewController {
    IBOutlet UITextView *textView;
    IBOutlet UIBarButtonItem *button;
    NSString* superString;
}

@property (nonatomic, copy) NSString* superString;

- (IBAction)buttonDown;

.m

@synthesize superString

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    [super viewDidLoad];
    [self setSuperString:[NSString stringWithFormat:"%@", @"A_super_string_file.txt"]];
    [self buttonDown];
}

- (IBAction)buttonDown {
    NSError* err = nil;
    NSString* text = [NSString stringWithContentsOfFile:superString encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding error:&err];
    [textView setText:text];
}

- (void)dealloc {
    [superString release];
    [super dealloc];
}
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Thanks for your answer! I already tried to use a property. But I set it by "superString = ..." instead "[self setSuperString:...]". The string autoreleased too. Is there an important difference between two ways to set string's value? –  Altaveron Aug 21 '11 at 23:39
    
When you use a property, the easiest thing to remember is to set it with self - as in self.superString = newString –  Doug Kress Aug 22 '11 at 2:26
    
Without the self. or [self Set..] you're not using the property. That's the important difference. –  Tom Irving Aug 22 '11 at 18:33

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