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I have some experience building web applications in html, css, javascript, jquery, and php. I understand what a wsdl document is made up of. I have been tasked to invoke a web service, which will then send an email that says "hello world."

After some hours of research, I've come across things like Apache Axis, XML-RPC, Open ESB, and Mule. Do I have to know java in order to invoke web service->send email? Is there a way to invoke a wsdl from within a web app using php?

I know about the mail() function in php. But I have been specifically told to learn how to invoke a web service. I'm lost and don't know where to begin.

I'm going to research Apache Axis until I figure out what to do.

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Might be referring to something like aws.amazon.com/ses or mailchimp.com –  Lucanos Aug 22 '11 at 2:50

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Do I have to know java in order to invoke web service->send email?

You can create a web service using any web/server-side languange. But you should understand what is "Web Service", at the firs place, before you go too far with your question. And stop thinking that Web Service = XML = Java.

I know about the mail() function in php. But I have been specifically told to learn how to invoke a web service. I'm lost and don't know where to begin.

Web services are starting to get fairly popular, but are not often well understood. When we talk about web service, we mean interfaces to data offered via HTTP, designed to be used programatically. With these loose definition, RSS feeds (also) appear to be a web service too since they share data across HTTP in format intended for parsing by software rather than humans, altough they're not usually included in such discussions.

Web service has become a label for XML sent over HTTP with read and write capabilities (but this is not the entire picturre). While HTTP always sit at the core (putting 'web' into 'webservices') we don't necessarily need to use XML, nor do we need to provide methods to write data. Many web services only allow querying and reading data.

While we already have a transport layer in our networking stack (TCP/UDP), then when we talk about web service (which actually an API on the top of HTTP), then we also need an API transport layer. When we talk about API transport layers, what we actually mean is a layer above the application layer at the top of OSI seven-layer model. Shortly, there tend to be three main contenders in this space,

A. REST

B. XML-RPC

C. SOAP

After you create your own public API, using ones of above transport layer, you can then encourage people to building with more outlandish languange and applications to build their own API kits, by providing the core set of languange support (PHP, Perl, Phyton, .NET, and Java).

So where is sending email in these explanation? Its just a part (a little one) of what you called "Web Service". After you have enough playing with "Web Service", then you will know exactly where you can put that as part of your Web Service.

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thank you so much for your reply. I've always understood web services exactly as you've described: "XML sent over HTTP with read and write capabilities," but you've led me to want to research those transport layers, which I don't know much about. I think first I need to look at php's ability to consume a web service though, because I think it might be within my current ability. I'm going to research wsdl2php, soapclient, and nuSoap. Also, this exercise is a "hello world" exercise. It doesn't matter what web service I use, I just need to send an email. I'm embarrassed how hard this is for me :( –  junsungwong Aug 22 '11 at 5:16

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