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I have this code:

    public void replay() {
        long previous = DateTime.Now.Ticks;
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
            Thread.Sleep(300);
            long cur = DateTime.Now.Ticks;
            Console.WriteLine(cur - previous);
            previous = cur;
        }
    }

Which is invoked as a separate thread like this:

        MethodInvoker replayer = new MethodInvoker(replay);
        replayer.BeginInvoke(null, null);

However, if I watch the output, it acts strangely. It outputs i in pairs. For example, it'll wait a full wait, then output i, then quickly output the next i too, then wait again. Why is it doing that and how can I correct it?

It outputs this:

3125040
2968788
2968788
2968788
3125040
2968788
2968788
2968788
3125040
2968788
2968788
2968788
3125040

If I increase the sleep to more than a second this doesn't happen.

share|improve this question
    
First, is this in release or debug mode? Second, use a timer as opposed to just watching the console output - there's no guarantee that the console will display things immediately. –  Tamas Czinege Apr 3 '09 at 14:52
    
it's in debug mode –  Malfist Apr 3 '09 at 14:54
    
Are you sure this isn't buffering at the console? –  annakata Apr 3 '09 at 14:56
    
Looking at the output, there is less than 5 % variance is the delay between loop executions... The perceived discrepanacy is just uin the display... –  Charles Bretana Apr 3 '09 at 15:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Change the code to eliminate display latency in your analysis:

public void replay() 
{        
    Thread.Sleep(5000);
    DateTime start = DateTime.Now;      
    for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) 
    {            
          Console.WriteLine(string.Format("Exec:{0} - {1} ms",
                i, DateTime.Now - start));
          start = DateTime.Now;
          Thread.Sleep(300);        
    }
}

Looking at your modified output, there is less than 5% variance (15ms out of the 300) in the loop delay. This is normal, due to the uncertainties involved in when the OS actually assigns timeslices to the thread... (If I recall correctly, in a windows OS, this is normally only every 20 ms !)

The larger discrepancy you perceive in the console output is almost certainly due to display latencys.

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Cannot reproduce. I wonder if it is something local to your machine; buffering, perhaps.

share|improve this answer
    
Can't reproduce here either. –  LukeH Apr 3 '09 at 14:54
    
ditto. bring up task manager and watch your processes. I suspect something's eating up cycles. –  Michael Meadows Apr 3 '09 at 14:56
    
suggest the OP write the output to something else - a Dictionary<Int,DateTime> perhaps - to double check –  annakata Apr 3 '09 at 15:00
    
updated the question to show more data. I'm on a quad core, and most of the CPU isn't utilized. –  Malfist Apr 3 '09 at 15:01
    
and what's wrong with the output you're getting? –  lc. Apr 3 '09 at 15:05

I can't reproduce this, but you might want to consider a timer. It would be more reliable.

public class Counter
{
    private readonly TimeSpan initialDelay, incrementDelay;
    private readonly int maxCount;
    private Timer timer;
    private int count;

    public Counter(TimeSpan initialDelay, TimeSpan incrementDelay, int maxCount)
    {
        this.maxCount = maxCount;
        this.initialDelay = initialDelay;
        this.incrementDelay = incrementDelay;
    }

    public void Start(Action<int> tickBehavior)
    {
        if (timer != null)
        {
            Timer temp = timer;
            timer = null;
            temp.Dispose();
        }
        timer = new Timer(() =>
            {
                tickBehavior(count++);
                if (count > maxCount) timer.Dispose();
            }, null, initialDelay, incrementDelay);
    }
}

Use it:

Counter counter = new Counter(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5), TimeSpan.FromSeconds(.3), 1000);
counter.Start((count) => Console.WriteLine(count););

EDIT

I'm using System.Threading.Timer, but Counter could be easily be modified to use System.Timers.Timer or System.Windows.Forms.Timer depending on your need. See this link for a description of when to use which timers.

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+1 that piece of code is the coolest thing I've seen all week :) –  Christopher Klein Apr 3 '09 at 19:24

Your sleep inside the loop is only 300ms, which isn't very long. You application will do the following:

  • Sleep 5 secs
  • print 0
  • Sleep 300ms
  • print 1
  • Sleep 300ms
  • print 2

etc.

share|improve this answer
    
But it's not, and that's the problem. –  Malfist Apr 3 '09 at 15:03

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