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I've been trying to identify some performance issues with our ASP.NET Web application. It's an online application, used by multiple users(10+). Just a quick overview: The applcation uses a combination of web forms, MVC Pages, web services etc... When multiple users connects to the app, it seems to become really slow. After investigating the memory, it seems as if the application is using A LOT of memory and that is slowing down the machine, which indicates unmanaged resources not being disposed of. I installed ANTS, and then captured a few applications on the system. It turns out a lot of the memory is used by unmanaged resources: http://tinypic.com/r/154ujra/7

This is the first time I've been profiling memory. ANTS profiler indicates that one of my classes (RULE) has a high number of live instances: http://tinypic.com/r/1264ltu/7 (Which doesn't seem to be freed up by the GC)

After drilling down into class level, http://tinypic.com/r/2r3v6nq/7, it displays a warning that the class isn't released from memory, and this could be because of an event handler not being unregistered. Now that class does contain an event handler instance, so could it be that?

public class Rule
{
    public event EventHandler deleted;

    public void Delete()
    {
        if (baseQuestionnaire.basePortfolio.mode != Mode.Admin)
        {
            throw new Exception("Rules can only be deleted in Admin mode");
        }
        else
        {
            // Delete the rule from the database
            if (id != -1)
            {
                string delete = "DELETE FROM tb" + DataManager.dbPrefix + "_QuestionRule WHERE QuestionRuleId = " + id.ToString();
                DataManager.execute(delete);
            }

            // Raise a deleted event
            if (deleted != null)
                deleted(this, new EventArgs());
        }
    }
 } 

Event is then assigned in another class like this, but never unregistered

public class Option : IComparable
{

    public void AddRule(Rule newRule)
    {
        newRule.deleted += new EventHandler(newRule_deleted);
        allRules.Add(newRule);
    }

    ............................
 }
share|improve this question
    
What is the DataManager? Can you show the code of that one too? –  Jakob Gade Aug 22 '11 at 4:34
    
DataManager is a sealed static class containing frequently used database methods and wrappers, like the execute method above which is a simply wrapper for cmd.ExecuteNonQuery(); –  FaNIX Aug 22 '11 at 5:04

1 Answer 1

Hmm.. I see that the eventhandler 'deleted' is a public one. So my guess is that the Rule object is created first and then the Rule.deleted is assigned an eventhandler. If this is the case then as you suspected, the eventhandler is probably the cause of Rule objects not being garbage collected.

EDIT:

Maybe you could try something like this:

public class Option : IComparable, IDisposable
{

    private Rule newRule;
    private EventHandler newRuleDeletedEventHandler;

    public void AddRule(Rule newRule)
    {
        this.newRule = newRule;
        newRuleDeletedEventHandler = new EventHandler(newRule_deleted);
        newRule.deleted += newRuleDeletedEventHandler;
        allRules.Add(newRule);
    }

    public override void dispose()
    {
        newRule.deleted -= newRuleDeletedEventHandler;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I updated the thread. The event is assigned in another class called Option. I'm just not sure when and how exactly to unregister the event. –  FaNIX Aug 22 '11 at 5:02
    
Yeah thats what I thought as well. Do I need to call the dispose method on the rule objects explicitly at any time or is the above all I need to do? I also implemented the Finalise method which calls the dispose method in case the object doesn't get disposed or if the reference to it is lost. –  FaNIX Aug 22 '11 at 23:35
    
You might not need to do anything in the Rule class as such - reason being it is the references to Rule class that are creating problem, and at this point we suspect Option as being the culprit. Finalize may help, in fact, you can refactor this to deregister the event in th Finalize of Options itself rather than dispose. So, after this do you see any difference? Or are we barking up the wrong tree? –  Srikanth Venugopalan Aug 23 '11 at 1:03

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