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I'm working on a problem which requires me to use the STL linked list class to represent a polynomials. I've made a good start on getting the class definition, however I'm a little confused as to where to go next (novice programmer - please excuse my potential ignorance).

class Polynomial
{
    public:
        Polynomial(); //Default constructor
        Polynomial(pair<double,int>); //Specified constructor
        void add(Polynomial);
        Polynomial multiply(Polynomial);
        void print();
    private:
        list<int> order_terms;
        list<double> coeffs;
};

I have two questions:

1) It seems more elegant to store the terms and coefficients as a pair - however I'm unsure how to get that working using the STL list.

2) Regarding the add member function, I'm unsure how to implement it such that I can define a Polynomial and then add terms to it like this:

Polynomial test(pair<3.14,0>);
Polynomial test_2(pair<2,1>);
test.add(test_2);

The main thing I'm having issues with understanding how to access the terms stored in the other object and linking it to the first Polynomial.

Any help greatly appreciated.

EDIT: Code for the add() function - currently not working

void Polynomial::add(const Polynomial& rhs)
{
//Perform some sort of sort here to make sure both lists are correctly sorted
//Traverse the list of terms to see if there's an existing nth order
//term in the list on the left-hand-side polynomial.
list<int>::iterator itr;
list<int>::iterator itl;
for(itr=rhs->terms.begin(); itr!=rhs->terms.end(); itr++)
{
    bool match=0;
    //See if there's an existing terms, if so add to it
    for(itl=terms.begin(); itl!=terms.end(); itl++)
    {
        if(*itl->second)==*itr->second)
        {
            *itl->first+=*itr->first;
            match = 1;
         }      
    }

    //If not, this is the first nth order term so just push it onto the list
    if(!match){ terms.push_back(*itr); //Perform the sort again }         
}
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It may interest you that a polynomial library was submitted to boost (and not as of yet accepted as being up to standard, they felt it needed more work). But it's out there and at least someone was working on it, you might either draw from it or improve it: svn.boost.org/svn/boost/sandbox/SOC/2008/polynomial/libs/docs/… –  HostileFork Aug 22 '11 at 4:44
    
Not sure why you want a pair of items, unless you know you need to support high degree polynomials with few terms. E.g. x^100 + x^10 + 1. If you just need low order polynomials just store the co-efficients, and use explicit zero coofficients where needed. E.g. x^4 + x^2 + 1 becomes { 1,0,1,0,1}. Which might mean that a std::vector<double> does a better job. –  Keith Aug 22 '11 at 5:52
    
Remember that coefficients don't have to be integers and you can add new ones in-between existing ones so a vector might not be best. Anyways, he needs a list and a pair is a decent enough way to implement this. –  Graff Aug 22 '11 at 13:08
    
std::list has a sort() method, I'd call it in the constructor so you don't sort any time you do an add. You might also want to fill-in any missing coefficients with terms set to 0, then you can use one loop to do the addition. I'll add an example in my answer. –  Graff Aug 23 '11 at 4:45
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Others have explained list<pair<double, int> > (and I like shelleybutterfly's suggestion to derive Polynomial from the list, except that I'd make it protected, not public, so that outside code is not too free to mess with the contents of the list).

But the add function is a little tricky, because adding two polynomials doesn't generally mean concatenating them or adding their terms together. The operation is actually more like merging-- and you'll soon see that the lists must be sorted. (In fact, it's more natural to represent polynomials as vectors, but I guess that's not the assignment.)

I suggest you implement Polynomial::add(pair<double, int>), first, then implement the other one (add(Polynomial &)) in terms of that.

I don't want to spell it out too much, since this looks like homework. Is this enough to point you in the right direction?

EDIT:
Your new code looks correct (albeit inefficient) if you fix a couple of bugs:

void Polynomial::add(const Polynomial& rhs)
{
  // Don't forget to implement the sorting routine.

  // The iterators must be of the correct type. And itr must be const,
  // since you have declared rhs to be a const reference. The compiler
  // will not allow you to have an iterator with the power to alter
  // a const thing.

  list<pair<double,int> >::const_iterator itr;
  list<pair<double,int> >::iterator itl;

  for(itr=rhs->terms.begin(); itr!=rhs->terms.end(); itr++)
    {
      bool match=false;
      for(itl=terms.begin(); itl!=terms.end(); itl++)
        {
          // You have an extra parenthesis here, and too much dereferencing.
          if(itl->second == itr->second)
            {
              itl->first+=itr->first;
              match = true;
            }
        }
      if(!match)
        { terms.push_back(*itr); //Perform the sort again
        } // Be careful not to catch the closing brace in a comment
    }
  }

Once it is working, you can think about ways to make it cleaner and more efficient. For example, if you insert the new term in the right place, the list will always be in the right order and there will be no need for a sort routine.

share|improve this answer
    
You are correct, I'd much rather just do it with a vector. But alas, it needs to be done with an STL list. I had been thinking about how to do add the two. I think sort both lists, check to see if there is an existing nth order element on the left hand term, corresponding to an element on the right hand term. If there is, add the coefficients. If there's not, push_back() into the list and sort again. –  faggaj Aug 22 '11 at 6:48
    
I just put together some rough code for the add() function. I've edited it into the original post. It doesn't seem to work though (I'm very new to C++, pretty sure my pointer dereferencing is wrong but I'm unsure how to fix it). I'll add the sorting stuff once I get that part working. –  faggaj Aug 22 '11 at 7:04
    
@faggaj If you have an iterator iter then to access the second member of a pair that it points to you would either do (*iter).second or iter->second, not usually both. *iter dereferences the variable and . calls a method or accesses a member variable. -> does both the dereference and the call in one operator. See dereference operator and arrow operator –  Graff Aug 23 '11 at 6:17
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To use a pair in a list you can do: list<pair<double, int> > - note the space between the >. It's also nice to do something like

typedef pair<double, int> TermCoeff;
list<TermCoeff> equation;

To sort a list:

list<TermCoeff> equation;
// insert items
equation.sort(coeff_compare);

There are pre-defined comparator functions for a pair in the <utility> header. They compare the first elements and then the second ones if first is equal.

For your second question you should remember that an object of a class can access the member variables of an object of the same class, even if they are private. If you don't leave any gaps in your coefficients (in the constructor fill in missing ones with the second value of the pair set to 0) this means your add method can look like:

Polynomial& Polynomial::add(const Polynomial& rhs) {
  // constructor should sort all terms and enforce that all terms are present
  // lhs = current object (left hand side of operator)
  // rhs = other object (right hand side of operator)
  // example: lhs.add(rhs)
  list<TermCoeff>::const_iterator rhs_iter = rhs.terms.begin();
  list<TermCoeff>::iterator lhs_iter = terms.begin();

  while(rhs_iter != rhs.terms.end()) {
    if (lhs_iter != terms.end()) {
      // add because we aren't at the end of current object's terms
      lhs_iter->second += rhs_iter->second;
      ++lhs_iter;
    } else {
      // insert because we are at the end of current object's terms
      terms.push_back(*rhs_iter);
      lhs_iter = terms.end(); // keep the iterator at the end
    }
    ++rhs_iter;
  }
  return *this;
}

int main (int argc, const char * argv[])
{
  list<TermCoeff> first, second;
  first.push_back(TermCoeff(0, 0.0)); // empty
  first.push_back(TermCoeff(1, 5.0));
  first.push_back(TermCoeff(2, 5.0));
  second.push_back(TermCoeff(0, 6.0));
  second.push_back(TermCoeff(1, 0.0)); // empty
  second.push_back(TermCoeff(2, 8.0));
  second.push_back(TermCoeff(3, 9.0));

  Polynomial first_eq(first);
  Polynomial second_eq(second);
  first_eq.add(second_eq);
  first_eq.print();
  return 0;
}

Note that I returned a reference to the current object. This is a nice thing to do in an addition method because then you can chain additions:

first.add(second).add(third);

or

first.add(second.add(third));
share|improve this answer
    
Thank-you! Your first solution was exactly the kind of thing I was after. –  faggaj Aug 22 '11 at 5:01
    
Just as a suggestion, I'd implement this as a std::map rather than a std::list. You could have your coefficients as the keys and have the terms be the values. Then when you do your math you just look up each key, get the value, and perform the operation. –  Graff Aug 22 '11 at 5:12
    
I have to use a list though since that's what the question specifies. If I had my way I'd just do it with a vector since it surely won't need to support that many terms. There are probably other ways too. But alas, that's what the requirements say. ;-) –  faggaj Aug 22 '11 at 6:32
    
Ahh yeah, if you must you must! Well you can always implement your own map class backed by a list...lol! Good luck with it. –  Graff Aug 22 '11 at 13:06
    
std::list does not contain operator[] members last I checked, and not all terms in one might be in the other, so add(...) is vastly more complicated than you make it look. –  Mooing Duck Aug 23 '11 at 0:04
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As for using a pair, why not use a list<pair<double, int>> (list< pair<double, int> > for older compilers)? Or you could even define a separate class to hold your pair like so:

// example is implemented inline, you could always pull it out to
// your source file; although it's even possible that you could 
// do everything inline if you want to allow just including a
// header but not having to link a separate file.
class CoeffAndTerm : public pair<double,int>
{ 
public:
   // if you need it you should put extra functions here to 
   // provide abstractions: 
   double getTotalValue()
   {
       return first * second;
   }
} 

and then use

list<CoeffAndTerm> Polynomial;

as your variable, or even

// same stuff goes for this class RE: the inline function definitions
class Polynomial : public list<CoeffAndTerm>
{
public:
     // same goes here for the abstraction stuff maybe things 
     // like in your current Polynomial class; assuming some 
     // functions here ...
     Polynomial Multiply(Polynomial other)
     {
         Polynomial Result = new Polynomial();

         for (int i=0; i < size(); ++i)
         {
             Result.addCoeffAndTerm(
                 new CoeffAndTerm(
                     other.first * first, 
                     other.second * second
                 );
         }

         return Result;
     }

}

so that you've got Polynomial being a derivation of the list itself. Not sure the exact usage of the Polynomial, so it's hard for me to speak to which makes more sense, but I like this way better as a general rule for a type such as this; seems to be that the polynomial "is a" list of coefficient and terms, it doesn't just "have" one. :) I'm sure that's debatable, and again it depends on the actual usage of your code.

for the operations, you could do reference returns, as in one of the other examples, but I have implemented the multiply without modifying the existing value, which you could also do for Add, Subtract, etc. so, assuming First, Second, Third, etc. are other polynomials

Polynomial Result = First.Multiply(Second).Add(Third).Subtract(Fourth);

you could also implement copy constructor, operator =, operator +, operator *, operator / and then do things that look like normal math:

Polynomial Result = First * Second + Third - Fourth;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. If you can imagine the polynomial 2x^2 + 3x + 5, 2x^2 is the first TERM, where the COEFFICIENT in 2, and the order is 2. So stored in my list, the polynomial above would be (2,2), (3,1), (5,0). Hopefully that makes more sense. :-) As for the other stuff, I've redefined by class to store the list of terms as list<<pair<double, int> >, as I think that's a bit simpler. I'm having trouble understanding how I'd implement the add and multiply functions, specifically the part about accessing the data members of the Polynomial I'm passing as an argument. Cheers! –  faggaj Aug 22 '11 at 5:06
    
cheers! :) oohh, ok, gotcha. well, as for the implementation of the add and multiply, I think that perhaps there are just different meanings of simple. the reasoning for my idea of deriving a separate class from pair<double, int>, is that you keep the operations where they naturally go, rather than moving them up a level and making the list take care of it. to do any operations on the CoeffAndTerm class, you just access first and second directly, since it is just a pair<double, int>. (you can do this->first and this->second if that suits you better). –  shelleybutterfly Aug 22 '11 at 5:16
    
then for the Polynomial class itself, it is derived from list<CoeffAndTerm>, and CoeffAndTerm is still a pair<double, int>, via inheritance, but with extra functionality. now, though, you've separated concerns: the CoeffAndTerm is responsible for doing the math on itself, and Polynomial is responsible for doing the math on itself, without violating the encapsulation of the CoeffAndTerm class. To me, that's the true simplicity, otherwise the Polynomial digs into details of something it needs not know about. But, in this case it probably isn't too bad if it suits your needs. best wishes! :) –  shelleybutterfly Aug 22 '11 at 5:19
    
actually this has gotten my curiosity up, I'm going to go ahead and try to implement a basic version that may be somewhat of a hybrid of my two answers, with operators and all, and I'll upload it here once I'm finished. –  shelleybutterfly Aug 22 '11 at 5:23
    
also, as a clarification, I always had heard "term" used for the entire thing, "coefficient" for the thing you multiply by, and "exponent" for the thing you're calling term; does that seem reasonable? –  shelleybutterfly Aug 22 '11 at 5:24
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While it's possible to use std::pair to group the term order and coefficient, I would recomment against it: it's not very readable - it's not clear what 'first' and 'second' means, and C++ will implicitly cast between numeric types - and you get no benefit from the added functionality of pair (ordering).

Instead, create a class like:

class Term {
    double coeff_;
    int exp_;
public:
    Term(double coeff, int exp): coeff_(coeff), exp_(exp) {}
    double coefficient() const { return coeff; }
    int exponent() const { return exp; }
    [...]
};

class Polynomial {
    std::list<Term> terms;
[...]

Making fields public (e.g. by using struct or publicly deriving from pair) for performance reasons is not a good idea: inline constructor, getters and setters are just as fast as reading or writing the variable directly, and they have the advantage of encapsulating the implementation.

For that matter, you may want to create separate types to wrap polynomial coefficients and exponents themselves, in order to avoid mixing up numeric types, and performing nonsensical operations e.g.:

class Coefficient {
    double val;
public:
    explicit Coefficient(double value): val(value) {}
    double getValue() { return val; }
    double operator*(double rhs) { return val*rhs; }
    Coefficient operator+(const Coefficient& rhs) {
        return Coefficient(val+rhs.val);
    }
[...]
};

etc.

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Another possibility: instead of using a class, you could make as struct to represent the term and coefficient; you still can define methods on it just like a class, but the members are public by default which may make sense for efficiency reasons, especially if you're doing a lot of processing with these things. So, maybe:

 struct CoeffAndTerm
 {
     int Term;
     double Coeff;

     private CoeffAndTerm(int parTerm, double parCoeff)
     {
         Term = parTerm;
         Coeff = parCoeff;
     }

     public static CoeffAndTerm Make(int parTerm, double parCoeff)
     {
         return new CoeffAndTerm(parTerm, parCoeff);
     }

     // etc. and otherwise you can just do things as given in the example
     // with the classes deriving from list<pair<int, double>>, e.g., 
     // silly example again
     public double getTotalValue()
     {
         return first * second;
     }
 }

and same applies otherwise as in the first example, again giving more direct access than that example had, but still allowing for the abstraction methods to be placed directly on the object

struct Polynomial : public list<CoeffAndTerm>
{
    list<CoeffAndTerm> CoefficientsAndTerms;

    Polynomial Multiply(Polynomial other)
    {
        Polynomial Result = new Polynomial();

        for (int i=0; i < size(); ++i)
        {
            Result.addCoeffAndTerm(
                new CoeffAndTerm(
                    other.first * first, 
                    other.second * second
                );
        }

        return Result;
    }

   // etc.
}
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