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I would like to find all <Field /> nodes (that may be arbitrarily nested) inside a given XmlNode.

If do something like this:

foreach(XmlNode n in node.SelectNodes('//Field'))...

This returns all nodes in the entire document, not all nodes under node.

Is this how XPath is supposed to work? I looked at some documents and it seems like the //Node query should be scoped to whatever node it's invoked at.

Is there any other technique to select all nodes with a given name that are under a specific node?

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1  
Have you considered using LINQ to XML? It's much easier to work with than XPath. – Zebi Aug 22 '11 at 6:05

If you use '//Field' it's absolut from the root of the document. To search relative to the current node, just use './/Field'.

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Use ./Field.

  • .// Means descendants, which includes children of children (and so forth).
  • ./ Means direct children.

If a XPath starts with a / it becomes relative to the root of the document; to make it relative to your own node start it with ./.

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try to use SelecteSingleNode()

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Remove // because otherwise it search among all the document irrelatively to the root node.

node.SelectNodes("Field")
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You can use simple linq query like this:

var techLeads = (from value in element.Descendants ("Manager")
where value.Attribute ("Name").Value == "Mgr1"
select value).Descendants("TechLead");

Sample Xml:

<Employees>
 <Manager Name="Mgr1">
  <TechLead Name="TL1" />
  <TechLead Name="TL2" />
 </Manager>
</Employees>
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