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I'm using bash shell.

Hi,ppl Would be glad if someone could provide some kind of advice, because googling around yielded some answers but couldn't still get the script to work.

I'am new to using bash script and got a script to modify because it was failing to copy a large number of files from and input directory to an output directory after the files were processed.

Description:

We have a bunch of pdf's in a large directory. We process a file called filename.pdf, after it's processed an additional file is created called filename.pdf.marker Then both files filename.pdf.marker and filename.pdf shoud be moved from input/in directory to directory output/out. We work with about 10 -15 thousands of files.

The script should do the following:

  1. select all .marker file names
  2. move.marker files from input/in directory to directory output/out (done in separate line)
  3. remove the .marker from the selected filename,
  4. move the file filename.pdf to the output/out directory

Old script (didn't work for a larger number of files) :

FILELIST=$(ls ${V04}/*.pdf.marker 2> /dev/null | sort)
for FILEMARKER in ${FILELIST}; do
    FILENAME=${V04}/$(basename $FILEMARKER .marker)
        mv ${FILENAME} ${VLOGDIR}/.  
        mv ${FILENAME}.marker ${VLOGDIR}/.  
    done  

Because of that I needed to use xargs command.

Problem:

I managed to move the .marker files in a separate line. Now i need to move the .pdf files with this script line.

find /input/in -iname "*.marker" -print0 | xargs -0 -r -I {} mv `basename {} .marker`  /output/out

My problem lies in the part: `basename {} .marker` Why isn't the string filename.pdf extracted from the string filename.pdf.marker, and substituted into the mv command ?

Any help i's welcome ;)

UPDATED

  • Corrected description of what script should do: Both filetypes .pdf and .pdf.marker should be moved in my script not copied.
  • Added old script that didn't work well for larger amount of files.
share|improve this question
    
Side note: ls in backticks is almost always the wrong thing to do. for FILENAME in $VLOGDIR/*.pdf; do ... will be sorted already. Why do you care about sort order anyway? –  tripleee Aug 22 '11 at 7:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The problem with the old script was, that you try to catch all entries in one var, which have size limits. You can solve that, if you must not sort the entries in this way:

ls -1 "${V04}/*.pdf,.marker | while read FM; 
do 
    mv "${FM}" "${VLOGDIR}/"
    mv "${V04}/$(basename "${FM}" .marker)" "${VLOGDIR}/"
done;
share|improve this answer
    
Thx! You were right, this worked fine for me. –  Mandark Aug 22 '11 at 11:57

The problem is that the command in backticks is executed once before xargs is ever invoked.

The fix is a bit harder, not least because your step 2 says 'copy' but the previous description suggests 'move'. I'd probably create a simple script to be invoked by xargs:

find /input/in -name '*.marker' -print0 | xargs -0 mover.sh

The contents of mover.sh might be:

for mrk_source in "$@"
do
    pdf_source=$(echo "$mrk_source" | sed 's/\.marker$//')
    mrk_target=$(echo "/output/out/$mrk_source" | sed 's%/input/in%%')
    pdf_target=$(echo "/output/out/$pdf_source" | sed 's%/input/in%%')
    mv "$mrk_source" "$mrk_target"
    mv "$pdf_source" "$pdf_target"
done

Note that this code preserves any directory structure under /input/in but assumes that the corresponding directory exists under /output/out (without checking). It would be possible to alter the code to flatten any directory structure, or to create the directories as needed (exercise for the reader). There is a small sleight-of-hand going on in the file name manipulation in the two xxx_target assignment lines; I think it will work OK for relative names as well as absolute names, but be a little cautious with that part (test before using, in other words).


tripleee commented:

The echo and sed invocations are very brittle -- for example, echo on some platforms will interpret backslashes in the filename as escape sequences. Fortunately, you can use the shell's substitution mechanisms to mv "${mrk_source#.marker}" /output/out instead. (Why would you want to calculate the destination file name, when all you need to give to mv is the destination directory?)

I explained the destination file name - preserving sub-directories, so /input/in/dir1/abc.pdf goes to /output/out/dir1/abc.pdf; if you want to flatten the directory structure (or there is no directory structure), then simply specifying the destination is sufficient.

The problem with echo 'should not' be a problem in the sense that the original design of echo was simple and all the later additional ... baggage simply makes what should be utterly reliable into something horrendously unreliable. That said, there could be problems with names containing backticks, $(...) and so on. There are no problems with backticks or $(...) in the names. There is a problem with backslashes in the name.

$ mkdir -p input/in output/out
$ for name in a b 'c d' 'e  f  g' '$(cat x)' '`cat y`' 'a\\nb'
> do
>    cp /dev/null input/in/"$name.pdf"
>    cp /dev/null "input/in/$name.pdf.marker"
> done
$ ls -lR [io]*
input:
total 0
drwxr-xr-x  16 jleffler  staff  544 Aug 22 00:45 in

input/in:
total 0
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 $(cat x).pdf
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 $(cat x).pdf.marker
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 `cat y`.pdf
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 `cat y`.pdf.marker
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 a.pdf
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 a.pdf.marker
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 a\\nb.pdf
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 a\\nb.pdf.marker
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 b.pdf
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 b.pdf.marker
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 c d.pdf
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 c d.pdf.marker
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 e  f  g.pdf
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 e  f  g.pdf.marker

output:
total 0
drwxr-xr-x  2 jleffler  staff  68 Aug 22 00:45 out

output/out:
$ find input/in -name '*.marker' -print0 | xargs -0 sh mover.sh
mv: rename input/in/a\nb.pdf to ./output/out/a
b.pdf: No such file or directory
$ ls -lR [io]*
input:
total 0
drwxr-xr-x  3 jleffler  staff  102 Aug 22 00:46 in

input/in:
total 0
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 a\\nb.pdf

output:
total 0
drwxr-xr-x  15 jleffler  staff  510 Aug 22 00:46 out

output/out:
total 0
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 $(cat x).pdf
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 $(cat x).pdf.marker
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 `cat y`.pdf
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 `cat y`.pdf.marker
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 a.pdf
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 a.pdf.marker
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 a\nb.pdf.marker
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 b.pdf
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 b.pdf.marker
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 c d.pdf
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 c d.pdf.marker
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 e  f  g.pdf
-rw-r--r--  1 jleffler  staff  0 Aug 22 00:45 e  f  g.pdf.marker
$ 

Using the Bash built-ins is sensible; I'm still stuck in the 1980s on occasion, and need reminding of that.

Solution that works with backslashes etc

for mrk_source in "$@"
do
    pdf_source=${mrk_source%.marker}
    mrk_target=${mrk_source/\/input\/in/\/output\/out}
    pdf_target=${pdf_source/\/input\/in/\/output\/out}
    mv "$mrk_source" "$mrk_target"
    mv "$pdf_source" "$pdf_target"
done

With the same set of input files, this code works cleanly:

share|improve this answer
    
The echo and sed invocations are very brittle -- for example, echo on some platforms will interpret backslashes in the filename as escape sequences. Fortunately, you can use the shell's substitution mechanisms to mv "${mrk_source#.marker}" /output/out instead. (Why would you want to calculate the destination file name, when all you need to give to mv is the destination directory?) –  tripleee Aug 22 '11 at 7:36
    
I explained the destination file name - preserving sub-directories, so /input/in/dir1/abc.pdf goes to /output/out/dir1/abc.pdf; if you want to flatten the directory structure (or there is no directory structure), then simply specifying the destination is sufficient. The problem with echo 'should not' be a problem in the sense that the original design of echo was simple and all the later additional ... baggage simply makes what should be utterly reliable into something horrendously unreliable. That said, there could be problems with names containing backticks, $(...) and so on. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 22 '11 at 7:43
    
Thanks for the thorough explanation and fast answer! We just use a simple file naming schema using underscores and have no sub-directory structure to preserve whilst moving files. –  Mandark Aug 22 '11 at 12:08
    
There's a small typo in the first command line: the quotes don't match. Should either use two single quotes or double quotes. –  lionello Aug 13 at 3:02
    
@lionello: thanks. Fixed. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 13 at 3:04

EDIT: As pointed out in the comments, this will not work if there are spaces in the filenames. In that case see @Jonathan Leffler's answer (even if there are no spaces now, you should probably use his version anyway, to avoid breakage when there suddenly are spaces...).

Since the command is expanded before it is executed, you can't use it that way. The command you'll give xargs would look like this:

xargs -0 -r -I {} mv {} /output/out

Since it tries to remove any path components, and the a .marker suffix, from the string {}.

I'd say you want to use a loop in this case:

for f in $(find /input/in -iname "*.marker"); do
    mv `basename $f .marker` /output/out
done
share|improve this answer
    
That runs foul of spaces in file names - and the use of -print0 in the original suggests that might be a problem. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 22 '11 at 7:17
    
True. That makes your suggestion much better. –  carlpett Aug 22 '11 at 7:23
    
@Jonathan Leffler: Where did your answer go? As you took spaces into consideration, your answer should be better - I even edited in a reference to it in mine... –  carlpett Aug 22 '11 at 7:26
    
Still no good -- you cannot pass backticks to xargs (and you forgot to put them in). –  tripleee Aug 22 '11 at 7:29
    
My answer took a quick timeout while I resolved a problem with the file names :) –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 22 '11 at 7:31

With GNU Parallel you should be able to do:

ls "$V04"/*.pdf.marker | parallel -q mv {.} {} "$VLOGDIR"

This will work even if $V04 and $VLOGDIR contains ' " space \t.

Watch the intro video to learn more: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OpaiGYxkSuQ

share|improve this answer
    
TIL parallel. Thanks! –  lionello Aug 13 at 3:03

The backticks are executed at evaluation time, not when xargs runs. Perhaps try something like this?

find /input/in -iname "*.marker" -print0 |
xargs -r0 -i sh -c 'mv `basename "{}" .marker` /output/out; mv "{}" /output/out'

Edit: The shell is still problematic here; if the file name contains double quotes, it will not parse correctly. Using a separate script might be better:

find /input/in -iname "*.marker" -exec ./myscript {} \;

where myscript contains the simple moving commands:

#!/bin/sh
mv `basename "$1" .marker` /output/out
mv "$1" /output/out
share|improve this answer
    
I like the separate script, but don't forget that basename removes the directory part of the file name as well as the suffix of the file. You should stick with ${1%.marker}. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 22 '11 at 13:54

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