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I want to submit the form by press the ENTER key. But it also change the line in content. How to prevent this?

This is my code, but when hit ENTER, the ... run and Cursor moved to the next line:

function postmessage(e) {
    if(e) {
        e.preventDefault = null || e.preventDefault;
        if(e.preventDefault) {
            e.preventDefault();
        } else {
            e.returnValue = false;
        }
    }
    ....
    return false;
}

function submitmessage(e) {
    if(e.keyCode == 13) {
        postmessage(e);
    }
    return false;
}

function bindEvent(el, eventName, eventHandler) {
  if (el.addEventListener){
    el.addEventListener(eventName, eventHandler, false); 
  } else if (el.attachEvent){
    el.attachEvent('on'+eventName, eventHandler);
  }
}

bindEvent(text, 'keydown', submitmessage);
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What you mean "change line in content"? You mean that when pressed inside <textarea> it goes one line down, or something else? –  Shadow Wizard Aug 22 '11 at 8:27
    
You realise that users can still paste carriage returns, new lines and line feeds in a textarea element without pressing the enter key? –  RobG Aug 22 '11 at 8:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

While I completely agree with @Peter in that this will create a very awkward and annoying user experience, here's how to achieve it code-wise: Capture the event on a keydown, and bypass the newline with event.preventDefault(). Then manually submit your form.

Something like this:

var el = document.getElementById('#my_textarea');
if (el.addEventListener)
{
    el.addEventListener('keydown', checkEnter(event), false); 
} 
else if (el.attachEvent){
    el.attachEvent('keywodn', checkEnter(event));
}

function checkEnter(event)
{
    var charCode = (event.which) ? event.which : event.keyCode

    // Enter key
    if(charCode == 13) {
        event.preventDefault();
        document.myform.submit();
        return false;
    }
}

MDN Docs:

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Thanks for the answer, can you review my code? –  Bruce Dou Aug 22 '11 at 8:46
    
You're welcome! You should take the code over to codereview.stackexchange.com now :) –  AlienWebguy Aug 22 '11 at 9:01

Generally it is a bad idea to screw around with default behavior of the browser. Personally I would hate it if I was typing in some text, hit enter and bam, without a proper review of my data it get's submitted?!

If you don't want people to enter multiple lines in a textarea, why not make it a regular textbox (<input type="text" />)?

share|improve this answer
    
because I want the user to enter lots of content but the width is limited. –  Bruce Dou Aug 22 '11 at 8:48

e.stopPropagation(); stopped the default action.

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