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Java has Collections.singletonList(T) which returns a List<T> of exactly one element. Is there something similar in C# that returns an IList?

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

To answer your question, no. Sadly there is nothing built in, although it would often be useful when working with IEnumerable. You'll have to roll your own.

Update

Instead of using workarounds, here's an example of an efficient and immutable SingletonList that implements IList<T>:

Usage

SingletonList<int> bling = new SingletonList<int>(10);    

Code

public class SingletonList<T> : IList<T>
{
    private readonly T _item;

    public SingletonList(T item)
    {
        _item = item;
    }

    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        yield return _item;
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return GetEnumerator();
    }

    public void Add(T item)
    {
        throw new NotSupportedException("Add not supported.");
    }

    public void Clear()
    {
        throw new NotSupportedException("Clear not supported.");
    }

    public bool Contains(T item)
    {
        if (item == null) return _item == null;

        return item.Equals(_item);
    }

    public void CopyTo(T[] array, int arrayIndex)
    {
        if (array == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("array");

        array[arrayIndex] = _item;
    }

    public bool Remove(T item)
    {
        throw new NotSupportedException("Remove not supported.");
    }

    public int Count
    {
        get { return 1; }
    }

    public bool IsReadOnly
    {
        get { return true; }
    }

    public int IndexOf(T item)
    {
        return Contains(item) ? 0 : -1;
    }

    public void Insert(int index, T item)
    {
        throw new NotSupportedException("Insert not supported.");
    }

    public void RemoveAt(int index)
    {
        throw new NotSupportedException("RemoveAt not supported.");
    }

    public T this[int index]
    {
        get
        {
            if (index == 0) return _item;

            throw new IndexOutOfRangeException();
        }
        set { throw new NotSupportedException("Set not supported."); }
    }
} 
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@Downvoter Why the downvote? I'm just answering the question. The question wasn't "How do I implement Java's SingletonList in C#". – Tim Lloyd Aug 22 '11 at 8:58
    
There are 4 examples of how it could be done here. – Jonathan Dickinson Aug 22 '11 at 9:00
    
You can then feel free to downvote my answer and comment there; thus keeping all information pertaining to the limitations of that answer in one place, instead of calling me a smartass. – Jonathan Dickinson Aug 22 '11 at 9:09
1  
@BillW Quite often I have patterns where I work with IEnumerable<T> and I have to return an IEnumerable<T> with a single element. There is no built in type that supports an immutable collection for a single element, you have to use workarounds. A SingletonList is: convenient, efficient, correctly immutable and more readable. – Tim Lloyd Aug 22 '11 at 11:32
2  
@BillW This is great for IEnumerable<T> situations as they are meant to be immutable, however, implementing IList<T> is questionable as IList<T> clearly indicates collection mutation (e.g. Add, Remove, Insert, etc), which is at odds with the goals of SingletonList. However, IList<T> is used in the BCL for immutable collections (see ReadOnlyCollection) with the IsReadOnly property being the key. This situation is unfortunate as it breaks LSP i.e. sub-types are not behaviorally compatible as they do not fully implement interfaces. – Tim Lloyd Aug 22 '11 at 11:40

Array implements IList; and the length cannot be modified via Add (as ReadOnly is true).

Thus, SingletonList<int> could be implemented as easily as:

var slist = new int[] { 5 };

You may want to wrap it in a System.Collections.ObjectModel.ReadOnlyCollection<T> so that the single value cannot be changed (if the Java Singleton list works like this). E.g.

var slist = new System.Collections.ObjectModel.ReadOnlyCollection<int>(new int[] { 5 });

You can also create an extension method.

public static IList<T> AsSingletonList<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    foreach (var item in source)
    {
        return new System.Collections.ObjectModel.ReadOnlyCollection<T>(new T[] { item });
    }
    return new System.Collections.ObjectModel.ReadOnlyCollection<T>(new T[] { default(T) });
}

Or one that asserts there is exactly one value in the source:

public static IList<T> AsSingletonList<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    IList<T> result = null;
    foreach (var item in source)
    {
        if (result != null)
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("source", "Source had more than one value.");
        result = new System.Collections.ObjectModel.ReadOnlyCollection<T>(new T[] { item });
    }

    if (result == null)
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("source", "Source had no values.");
    return result;
}

Edit: Used ReadOnlyCollection<T> to prevent mutation of the single value.

Note: While I think the other answers are correct, the List<T> by default has a capacity of 10 - which is a tiny bit wasteful.

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-1 This does not create an immutable single item list. You can cast the result back to an array, and then change the value. – Tim Lloyd Aug 22 '11 at 9:06
    
@chibacity fixed. – Jonathan Dickinson Aug 22 '11 at 9:16
public static class IListExtensions
{
    public static IList<T> SingletonList<T>(this IList<T> iList, T item)
    {        
        return Enumerable.Range(0, 1).Select(i => item).ToList().AsReadOnly();

        // or
        var Result = new List<T>();
        Result.Add(item);
        return Result.AsReadOnly();
    }
}
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Add AsReadOnly() and its even inmutable. So: return Enumerable.Range(0, 1).Select(i => item).ToList().AsReadOnly() – ZoolWay Aug 22 '11 at 8:44
    
Isn't the single value in SingletonList read/write? – Jonathan Dickinson Aug 22 '11 at 8:57

In C#, you can use a list initializer with one element:

var x = new List<int> { 3 };

Contrary to singletonList, this list is mutable.

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This is a first for me: I am submitting an answer ... what I have to say does not lead itself to a comment, imho ... to a question which I think I do not fully understand ... in order to better understand the question. Consider:

    public class singletonList<T> : List<T>
    {
        public singletonList(T theValue) { base.Add(theValue); }

        public new void Add(T anotherValue) {}

        public new void AddRange(T anotherValue) {}

        public new void Clear() {}

        public new void Insert(int index, T anotherValue) {}

        public new void ToArray() {}
    }

This will create a new List of whatever Type which allows only one instance of its value-Type to exist inside the List. Obviously it's not fully 'fleshed-out' since you could still use 'InsertRange' and other List altering commands.

Here's a test verifying its 'immutable' for the internal List operators masked-out by the use of 'new' in their declarations.

    var q = new singletonList<int>(99);
    q.Add(100);
    q.Clear();
    q.Insert(0, 788);

I doubt this is what the OP wants, but I am curious if this perhaps does, meet the OP's spec in any way.

In spite of ChibaCity's kind explanations, I am still utterly baffled why one would ever want to use a List that contained only one element.

Thanks in advance for educating me, and if the cost of enlightenment is loss of votes, or face ... no problem; at my age I am not running for anything except staying in place, and face is best forgotten :)

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