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There is an expression which I've build to reduce the time section out of date time and to ZERO it.

 DateAdd(day, DateDiff(day, 0, PayDate), 0) 

My question is in this query (pseudo code) :

select 
    DateAdd(day, DateDiff(day, 0, PayDate), 0), 
    DateAdd(day, DateDiff(day, 0, PayDate), 0) + 3
where DateAdd(day, DateDiff(day, 0, PayDate), 0) > 3

The DateAdd expressions are all the same.

Here is my question :

  • Does SQL Server re-calculate each time it sees this expression (in the select and in the where clause...)
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I can't claim to fully understand your question, but why not try it and see? –  Caspar Aug 22 '11 at 8:40
    
i meant that : Does the sql recalculates this expression each time : DateAdd(day, DateDiff(day, 0, PayDate), 0) ????? –  Royi Namir Aug 22 '11 at 8:46
    
@Mid787: Do you mean to ask whether SQL Server re-calculates every occurrence of DATEADD in your query even if they are all identical? –  Andriy M Aug 22 '11 at 9:45
    
yes............ –  Royi Namir Aug 22 '11 at 9:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

When you use a function several times in a query, it will be called every time it is used.

The fact that you call it with the same parameters make no difference.

So yes, DATEDIFF and DATEADD will be called three times each.

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Even a deterministic function called with the same parameters? Seems like the optimiser might be missing a trick there, then? –  Matt Gibson Aug 22 '11 at 8:44
    
i meant that : Does the sql recalculates this expression each time : DateAdd(day, DateDiff(day, 0, PayDate), 0) ????? –  Royi Namir Aug 22 '11 at 8:46
    
@Mid787: I believe, this answer means to reply a definitive yes to your question. –  Andriy M Aug 22 '11 at 9:52

You can always use:

SELECT pd, pd+3
FROM
  ( SELECT DateAdd(day, DateDiff(day, 0, PayDate), 0) AS pd
    FROM ...
  )
WHERE pd > 3

The code looks more elegant and you can check performance comparing to your previous code.


You can also check this (half-improving):

SELECT pd, pd+3
FROM
  ( SELECT DateAdd(day, DateDiff(day, 0, PayDate), 0) AS pd
    FROM ...
    WHERE DateAdd(day, DateDiff(day, 0, PayDate), 0) > 3
  )

Testing with a big table will show some evidence.

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1  
still , didnt get answer to my specific question : Does "DateAdd(day, DateDiff(day, 0, PayDate), 0)" will be calculated each time ? –  Royi Namir Aug 22 '11 at 9:14
    
@Mid787: I agree with you that this doesn't answer your specific question, but it seems like you are interested that DATEADD be not recalculated, and this answer at least shows how to hint SQL Server strongly about the way you'd like it to be. –  Andriy M Aug 22 '11 at 9:50
    
@Andriy: thnx. (to Mid787: What I should have added is that I don't know the details of SQL-Server optimizer and I can't test now, but testing different versions with a big table (and counting the times needed) will give you enough evidence to conclude what happens in the inside of the optimizer.) –  ypercube Aug 22 '11 at 11:33

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