Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I read the enter key in a loop multiple times?

I've tried the following with no result.

char c;
for (i=0; i<n; i++){
    c = getchar ();
    fflushstdin ();
    if (c == '\n'){
        //do something
    }
}

And fflushstdin:

void fflushstdin (){
    int c;
    while ((c = fgetc (stdin)) != EOF && c != '\n');
}

If I read any other character instead of enter key it works perfect, but with enter key In some iterations I have to press the enter 2 times.

Thanks.

EDIT: I'm executing the program through putty on windows and the program is running on a virtualized linux mint on virtual box.

share|improve this question
    
getch() reads a key hit without waiting for you to press enter. getchar() requires you to hit enter, so you end up hitting twice. –  Vivek Aug 22 '11 at 9:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Why do you call fflushstdin()? If fgetc() returns something different from \n, that character is completely dropped.

This should work:

char prev = 0;

while(1)
{
    char c = getchar();

    if(c == '\n' && prev == c)
    {
        // double return pressed!
        break;
    }

    prev = c; 
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't know why but this solution is the correct O.o. Thanks! It solves the double enter key press. –  Gabriel Llamas Aug 22 '11 at 9:28
    
In regex expression, your solution above accepts '\n.*\n' whereas this accepts '\n\n' –  wormsparty Aug 22 '11 at 9:38

Try

if (ch == 13) {
  //do something
}

ASCII value of enter is 13, sometimes \n won't work.

share|improve this answer

You should go with:

char c;
for (i=0; i<n; i++){
    c = getchar ();
    fflushstdin ();
    if (c == 13){
        //do something
    }
}

since 13 is ASCII code for Enter key.

share|improve this answer
1  
Why not using '\r' instead? It is the same but much more readable. –  Ulrich Dangel Aug 22 '11 at 8:51
    
Still not working with 10 and 13. 10 produces the same result as \n and with 13 it simply does not execute the if condition. –  Gabriel Llamas Aug 22 '11 at 8:55
    
try as: c = getch(); and then if (c == 13) { ... } –  Vivek Aug 22 '11 at 9:09
    
@mru '\r' is no more readable than 13 IMO, #define ENTER_KEY 13 (or #define ENTER_KEY '\r', if you like) is. Code style is not relevant to this question though. –  Petr Abdulin Aug 22 '11 at 9:13
    
@Panther24 getch() in non-standard C function, and you should avoid using it. –  Petr Abdulin Aug 22 '11 at 9:19

You always executing getchar twice (even when there is no need for that). Try limiting calls to fflushstdin:

char c;
for (i=0; i<n; i++){
    c = getchar ();
    if ((c != EOF) && (c != '\n')) fflushstdin ();
    if (c == '\n'){
        //do something
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.