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Is there a sense to handle null pointer exception by such way like

private void doWork(Object object) {
    if (object == null) {
        try {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    } else {
        ...
    }
}

?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
You mean throw an exception merely so you can immediately catch it? –  Oliver Charlesworth Aug 22 '11 at 9:11
    
You are not handling any NullPointerExceptions there. Please be more clear. –  Felix Aug 22 '11 at 9:12
    
@Felix, NullPointerException != "a null pointer exception" :-) He is handling the exceptional case where the argument equals a null pointer. –  aioobe Aug 22 '11 at 9:14

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First, that code could be written more simply as:

private void doWork(Object object) {
    if (object == null) {
        new IllegalArgumentException().printStackTrace();
    } else {

    }
}

or (almost equivalently) as

private void doWork(Object object) {
    if (object == null) {
        Thread.dumpStack();
    } else {

    }
}

Second, is it doing something useful? Yes, it is printing is a stack trace for the current thread.

Third, is it a good idea? IMO, definitely NOT.

  • It is sending stuff to the standard error, which may be going to the console (where it could be lost if nobody is watching) or to /dev/null. Errors should be logged properly using your preferred logging subsystem.

  • It looks like it is squashing a probable error condition (i.e. the program is broken because this method has been called with an illegal argument) and then continuing. If this is really an error condition, then the code should probably be bailing out. If it is not, then the stack trace is noise.


In short, this looks like a "bandaid" solution to some problem. The correct solution is to remove this code (or replace it with code that simply throws IllegalArgumentException), and when the exception occurs figure out where it is coming from and fix the root problem.

share|improve this answer
    
You wrote that this is “definitely” a good idea, but it looks like you intended to say that it is not a good idea. –  Stuart Cook Aug 22 '11 at 11:28
    
@Stuart Cook - Indeed I did. Fixed. Thanks. –  Stephen C Aug 22 '11 at 12:04
    
wouldn't a NullPointerException be more appropriate? –  CrackerJack9 Aug 22 '11 at 20:57
    
@CrackerJack9 - debatable, personal preference, no clear guidelines ... –  Stephen C Aug 23 '11 at 3:58
    
@Stephen C Pretty clear: Thrown when an application attempts to use null in a case where an object is required. ... Applications should throw instances of this class to indicate other illegal uses of the null object. –  CrackerJack9 Aug 23 '11 at 7:47

No, that doesn't really make sense.

Don't catch the exception. Just do

if (object == null)
    throw new IllegalArgumentException("Argument object may not equal null");

According to your suggestion the method would be document as

Do some work given argument object. If object is null it prints some garbage on standard out and does nothing else.


As a side-note, since you're still learning Java, your try-catch block:

try {
    throw new IllegalArgumentException();
} catch (Exception e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

... is equivalent to ...

new IllegalArgumentException().printStackTrace();
share|improve this answer
    
It would be great to include which object was null in the errormessage. –  RoflcoptrException Aug 22 '11 at 9:11
    
Yes, but if you see in the log just this error message and you have multiple of them, you still don0t know where the error was. –  RoflcoptrException Aug 22 '11 at 9:16
    
Ah now I see what you meant. It was my fault, you cant do something like object.toString() in the error message if object is null. Sry. –  RoflcoptrException Aug 22 '11 at 9:19
    
@Roflcoptr - which object was null ?? An object can't be null ;) –  Andreas_D Aug 22 '11 at 9:19
    
Nope, you can't ;-) ...removing my comments. –  aioobe Aug 22 '11 at 9:20

It's fine to throw an exception if a null is an exceptional state, but the try/catch does not make much sense: you throw a new IllegalArgumentException();, catch it right afterwards, print a stacktrace an continue.

If you can handle the null case and just want to report, then you should write it to a log file:

if (object == null) {
  log.warn("method doWork has been called with a null argument");
}
// continue in the method

Otherwise the method should throw the exception back at it's caller

if (object == null) {
  throw new IllegalArgumentException("Hey stupid, RTFJD, NO calls with null!");
}

(replace exception message with something meaningful ;) )

share|improve this answer

Alternative:

private void throwIfNull(Object object, String message) throws NullPointerException {
    if (object == null) {
        throw new NullPointerException(message);
    }
}

Then you can specify your method to throw the exception back to the caller, like so

private void doWork(Object object) throws Exception {
    throwIfNull(object, "Object is null");

    //Other work....
    doWorkInternal(object);
}

In this case, you know that if doWorkInternal() method is called, the object was never null.

share|improve this answer

The simplest way is

if (object != null) {
  doWork();
} else {

}
share|improve this answer

if you don't want to catch the exception inside your function and let some calling function to handle this,

its better to do this :

public void doWork(Object object) throws NullPointerException {
  //code that might result NullPointerException. 
  //no handling of exception by yourself
}

But if want/should handle the exception within the definition of your method, your code is good.

share|improve this answer

When object came as null, it will automatically throw an null pointer exception. but you didn't handle it, and you are trying to throw an "IllegalArgumentException()", which isn't possible.

if (object == null) this line itself, an exception is thrown, and it won't execute the rest of the line.

share|improve this answer
3  
This advice is incorrect. Merely testing an object reference against null does not throw any kind of exception, and it is perfectly possible to throw new IllegalArgumentException(). –  Stuart Cook Aug 22 '11 at 11:26
    
I second that ... –  Angel O'Sphere Aug 23 '11 at 9:12

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