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First: I'm a complete beginner to C/C++ (although I have experience in PHP/Javascript). I have a few questions regarding the language and operating systems.

Is C/C++ an operating system independant language? As in, do all the programs that I write in C/C++ work when run in all operating systems?

Would I need an OS specific compiler to make my program run on it?

Are there any specific things that I need to address when writing a program for different OSes? (any syntax changes, or having to have specific software, etc)

In the future I would like to create my own video game of some sort, and while reading, I noted that DirectX works for windows and OpenGL is multiplatform. So is it correct to assume that some libraries are OS dependant? I have read somewhere that operating systems monitor access to certain places to increase security which prevents direct access of the video card.

Is coding for a particular OS considered worth my time? Or will there be a point in which I should say to myself that adding the extra code would complicate/clutter/hinder my progress with the program and maintaining it for future use?

And lastly, how should I design my program to work with multiple OSes? I would assume that keeping OS specific code as separate as possible would be ideal. For a lot of programs, I see separate download links based on your OS. So I'm curious how they manage (for future updates) the code for each one.

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First thing: there is no language called “C/C++”. C and C++ are fundamentally different languages in almost all regards. So which language are you asking about? –  Konrad Rudolph Aug 22 '11 at 9:14

3 Answers 3

My answer mainly about C, but C++ portability should be similar.

Is C/C++ an operating system independant language?

Yes, the language itself (as described in ISO standard) is system-independent and portable. This is true only when you write programs according to standard and don't use any external functions (standard has a list of functions, which must be implemented by each compiling environment)

As in, do all the programs that I write in C/C++ work when run in all operating systems?

No. You may write a non-portable code (e.g. which is declared as undefined-behavior in standard). You may also use OS-specific functions, like CreateProcessor mmap, which will limit your program portability.

Would I need an OS specific compiler to make my program run on it?

You need a compiler, that targets your OS. Also you need a standard C library (e.g. BSD libc, GNU glibc, Android boinic, etc) which will implement functions from standard.

Are there any specific things that I need to address when writing a program for different OSes? (any syntax changes, or having to have specific software, etc)

You should write program in portable way, in good style. There are a lot hard moments, e.g. you can't assume that int is 4-byte long or that void* can be casted to int. You need no any additional software.

If you want to use any external library, you should know, is the library portable, or not.

So is it correct to assume that some libraries are OS dependant?

Kind of. Some libraries are ported to many OS. There are some limits on portability.

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C/C++ are operating system independent languages. Of course you need a compiler for the architecture and OS you want to run; a program compiled for Windows will not run on Linux, and vice-versa. The (arguably) best compiler is GCC, which is also available for Windows (see MinGW) and is included by default in most linux distributions (although you may have to install it separately on some).

Regarding the libraries, yes, there are libraries which work on Windows only. A program which you write in C++ in Visual Studio and which uses its proprietary classes will not work/compile on Linux. If you want to have multi-platform support for games, use OpenGL instead of DirectX, it will make life easier for you.

I would split the program into multiple branches, one for Windows, one for Linux and one for Mac OS, since there are different GUI design methods with all of these (except if you decide to go with a cross-platform toolkit such as Qt).

Hope this helps :)

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Is C/C++ an operating system independant language?

Yes it is.

As in, do all the programs that I write in C/C++ work when run in all operating systems?

If there is a compiler / linker for your OS and if you are only using plain c or c++ - yes. But be aware that there are many OS depending libraries (including API's from the OS itself) which of course are not possible to use in an other OS. Many libraries are existing to hide the OS differences, e.g. boost.

Would I need an OS specific compiler to make my program run on it?

Yes.

So is it correct to assume that some libraries are OS dependant?

Yes, see above.

Are there any specific things that I need to address when writing a program for different OSes? (any syntax changes, or having to have specific software, etc)

The syntax is the same. Keep the OS API or specific libraries in mind.

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You mean "Yes they are"? ;) –  Nim Aug 22 '11 at 9:31
    
Yes, you're right. :-) –  Simon Aug 22 '11 at 10:15

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