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Well this is my case: I have an input date X (dd-mm-yyyy), and I want to count the number of days between it with the year part is changed into current year and today's date in SQL. I t comes with the following condition, after the year is changed temporarily: (Here's my current idea of the logic) - If date X is earlier than today, then difference = datediff(X,now), with the X year is current year - If date X is later than today, then difference = datediff(X,now), with the X year is one year before

Sample case: 1st case: The input date is 6-6-1990. Today (automatically generated) is 22-8-2011. Then the difference will be = datediff(6-6-2011,22-08-2011) 2nd case: The input date is 10-10-1990. Today (automatically generated) is 22-8-2011. Then the difference will be = datediff(10-10-2010,22-08-2011)

Any idea how to do this in SQL (in SQL Server)? Or is there any other more simple alternatives for this problem? I'd also like this to be done in the query and not using a stored procedure or function

Sorry if there's already a similar question, I just don't know the exact keyword for this problem :( if there's a question like this previously, feel free to direct me there.

Thanks in advance

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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Basically, @Andrei's solution, but in a single statement:

SELECT
  DayDiff = DATEDIFF(
    DAY,
    DATEADD(YEAR, CASE WHEN LastOcc > GETDATE() THEN -1 ELSE 0 END, LastOcc),
    GETDATE()
  )
FROM (
  SELECT LastOcc = DATEADD(YEAR, YEAR(GETDATE()) - YEAR(@InputDate), @InputDate)
) s
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I've decided to use this since I avoid using any store procedure/function, but I still give my thanks to Andrei for giving the way :D Thanks to Andriy M and Andrei , your solution totally works :D –  rpa Aug 23 '11 at 9:05
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This seems to do the job

    SELECT DATEDIFF(DAY, CONVERT(DATETIME, N'2011-06-06'), CONVERT(DATETIME, N'2011-08-22'))

So the basic syntax is

    SELECT DATEDIFF(DAY, CONVERT(DATETIME, N'yyyy-mm-dd'), CONVERT(DATETIME, N'yyyy-mm-dd '))

Alternatively, you can use GETDATE() instead of the string for today's date

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I have used "SELECT DATEDIFF( D, "+myDate+", GETDATE())" in my code, on SQL Server 2005. It works for me. The value myDate of course would be the DateTime input value.

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you should try this query:

create table #T (inp_date datetime)

insert #T values ('06-06-1990')
insert #T values ('08-22-1990')
insert #T values ('10-10-1990')

--select * from #T

select inp_date, GETDATE(),
    CASE
        WHEN DATEADD(yy,DATEDIFF(yy,inp_date,GETDATE()),inp_date) <= GETDATE()
            THEN DATEDIFF(dd,DATEADD(yy,DATEDIFF(yy,inp_date,GETDATE()),inp_date),GETDATE())
        ELSE DATEDIFF(dd,DATEADD(yy,DATEDIFF(yy,inp_date,GETDATE())-1,inp_date),GETDATE())
    END
from #T
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Here is the implementation (if I understood the logic you need correctly):

USE YourDbName
GO

CREATE FUNCTION YearPartDiff (@date datetime)
RETURNS int
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @dateCurrentYear datetime
    SET @dateCurrentYear = DATEADD(year, YEAR(GETDATE()) - YEAR(@date), @date)

    DECLARE @result int

    IF @dateCurrentYear < GETDATE()
        SET @result = ABS(DATEDIFF(day, @dateCurrentYear, GETDATE()))
    ELSE
        SET @result = ABS(DATEDIFF(day, DATEADD(year, -1, @dateCurrentYear), GETDATE()))

    RETURN(@result)
END
GO

And the example of usage:

USE YourDbName
GO

DECLARE @someDate datetime
SET @someDate = '2011-06-06'

SELECT dbo.YearPartDiff(@someDate) /*returns 77*/

SET @someDate = '2010-10-10'

SELECT dbo.YearPartDiff(@someDate) /*returns 316*/
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