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Let's say I want to store dogs in a database table with each dog having its own subclass in PHP.

Basically I want to avoid storing/listing the subclass names in different places in the code. What would be a good OOP approach for that?

abstract class Dog {
    protected $data;
    public function __construct($data) {
        $this->data = $data;
    }
    public function name() {
        return $this->data["name"];
    }
    abstract public function breed();
}

class GermanShepherd extends Dog {
    public function breed() {
        return _("German Shepherd");
    }
}

class BullDog extends Dog {
    public function breed() {
        return _("Bulldog");
    }
}

Now I have this class that handles groups of objects (i.e. dogs):

class Dogs {
    public static function getDogs() {
        // ...
        $ret = array();
        while ($row = mysql_fetch_assoc()) {
            switch ($row["type"]) { // I could do this using a lookup array
                 case "shepherd": $dog = "GermanShepherd"; break;
                 case "bulldog": $dog = "Bulldog"; break;
            }
            $ret[] = new $dog($row);
        }
        return $ret;
    }
}

And I would like to use this class to get the dog types in my view (especially for an add dog form), instead of listing the class names:

?><form><select name="type"><?php
foreach (array("GermanShepherd", "Bulldog") as $dog) { // here I would like to do avoid listing the class names again
    ?><option value="<?=$dog ?>"><?php
    $d = new $dog; // actually I can't instantiate the class here because I don't have any data at this point
    echo $d->name();
    ?></option><?php
}
?></select></form><?php

I would like to incorporate this into the Dogs class, something along the lines of this:

class Dogs {
    private static $dogs = array(
        "shepherd" => "GermanShepherd",
        "bulldog" => "Bulldog",
    );
    public static function getDogs() {
        // ...
        $ret = array();
        while ($row = mysql_fetch_assoc()) {
            $dog = self::$dogs[$row["type"]];
            $ret[] = new $dog($row);
        }
        return $ret;
    }

    public static function getDogTypes() {
        return array_values(self::$dogs);
    }
}

?><form><select name="type"><?php
foreach (Dogs::getDogTypes() as $dog) {
    ?><option value="<?=$dog ?>"><?php
    $d = new $dog; // here I still need to instantiate the class and I don't have any data to provide it with
    echo $d->name();
    ?></option><?php
}
?></select></form><?php

This would somewhat work so far, but what if I need more class specific information, for example when I have more fields specific to a dog type?

foreach (Dogs::getDogTypes() as $dog) {
    $d = new $dog; // instantiate again?
    foreach ($d->formFields() as $f) { // I wouldn't do it like this, just putting this here for demonstrative purposes
        echo $f;
    }
}

I think part of the problem lies in the fact that I need to be able to use my classes with and without database data: Everything seems very reasonable when I have the data from the database table, but I also need the data when I generate the form when creating a new dog.

Thanks for your ideas!

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First make use of Interfaces. This will show you that having more specific interfaces (different class methods and properties per subclass) will make you need to deal with them differently in concrete. So they will show you where the deficiencies are and will enable you to streamline your objects into something more re-useable.

As long as your objects are only storing some data, use a data transfer object instead - which is of any "type". So you don't need to deal with type. However, you can use StdClass or Array for that as well if you want to keep it basic. The plus-side is: You don't need to actually write that much code.

In case it's not sufficient (as it will be), only add the code when you need to. Should keep things more simple in the long run then. So start with a basic data transfer object class and build upon it.

So use the classes you write to separate concerns, not to interweave the concerns. Encapsulate what varies, so your code can actually benefit from your design.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your input, could you add a little code example so that I can better understand what you mean? Thanks! –  akirk Aug 22 '11 at 11:33
    
That would require you to coin in simple words what you actually try to achieve with your application. From the code you've given I can't say. I see: Reading structured data from the database and outputting it into HTML; Having a list of structured data. That is pretty abstract and already coded, hence not very suitable for a concrete example, as you could do that with arrays and standard functions even, which would not be a helpful OOAD example. So maybe you can add in simple sentences what you would like to do to your question? –  hakre Aug 22 '11 at 11:41
    
What brought me to the question was when adding a new object to the database: I need to retrieve the possible types (=subclasses) to display in a form. The objects share code (hence the subclassing of the class Dog). –  akirk Aug 22 '11 at 11:49
1  
Well if the dogs do not differ, you won't hardly need any subclasses at all. Give them a "race" property or whatever that is called with dogs and put the name of it in there. Looks like it's the only thing that differs. –  hakre Aug 22 '11 at 12:04
1  
Just create one dog class and in your code differ based on the race field. Should do the job w/o making things too complicated for you. Create an interface for dog as well, so you can change things later on more easily. –  hakre Aug 22 '11 at 12:38

I think the static array in your Dogs class is quite an acceptable solution. It doesn't cover for the instantiating problem, but you can fix that with a (static) factory method. To make the instantiating even easier and more scalable, you can make sure the stored strings map to object names somehow:

$dog = 'Dog' . ucfirst( $row['type'] );
$ret[] = new $dog;

I don't think a ->getFormFields() method is a bad idea at all; when the fields differ per Dog type, it would be perfectly valid OO to incorporate that in the object!

share|improve this answer

What about storing your dogs in a 2D array?

while ($row = mysql_fetch_assoc()) {
  switch ($row["type"]) { // I could do this using a lookup array
    case "shepherd": 
      $dog = "GermanShepherd"; 
      break;
    case "bulldog": 
      $dog = "Bulldog"; 
      break;
  } // switch

  $ret[$row["type"]][] = new $dog($row);
} // while
share|improve this answer
    
Well the thing that I can't wrap my head around is to use the data before an object can be instantiated, i.e. generate a form for the use case "add new dog" –  akirk Aug 22 '11 at 11:36
    
You have to use some external container stuff. If you're listing dogs by categories, you have to collect categories first, wheter you store categories in a separate list or you extract category information from objects later. That's why I say, store stuff pre-catalogized. Redundant? Yes. Who cares. You may set up a smart DogList class with Dog factory. –  ern0 Aug 22 '11 at 11:43

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