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First of all I want to show you what actually I want........

if input is ...

  2  3  4 
  5  6  6
  7  5  4

the output should be ...

 7  5  4
 2  3  4
 5  6  6     /*Each row is shifted circularly left by two positons */

I tried this code acc. to my knowledge (I am a beginner in C) and have written this thing ..

 /*To shift row of a 4 * 5 matrix by 2 positons left*/

 #include<stdio.h>

 int main() {

    int a[4][5],i,j,k,(*temp)[5];

    for(i=0;i<=3;i++) {
            for(j=0;j<=4;j++)
                    scanf("%d",*(a+i)+j);
    }


    for (k=1;k<=2;k++) {

            for(i=0;i<=3;i++) {

                    temp = (a+i);   /*I thought that *(a+i) will point to the address           of each row and so I should take it in a variable which is capable of pointing to a row of 5 variables that why TEMP */
                    (a+i) = (a+i+1);
                    (a+i+1) = temp;
            }

    }


     for(i=0;i<=3;i++) {

                   for(j=0;j<=4;j++)
                            printf("%d\t",*(*(a+i)+j));


            printf("\n");

     }


  return 0;

 }

where am I wrong.....Please correct me ????

share|improve this question
1  
Doesn't look to me like the desired result is actually "shifting each row left by 2", but instead by 3 ... i.e. you want the top row on the bottom and the other rows shift up? Can you clarify, please? –  noelicus Aug 22 '11 at 12:00
    
No the given sample is correct... for ex- take (2,3,4) its initial index is 0.After making two shift circularly index goes 0-->2-->1 that what output is reflecting . –  Udit Gupta Aug 22 '11 at 13:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
  1. Your sample output looking like shifted along column :)
  2. scanf("%d",*(a+i)+j); is not a good way, use scanf("%d",&a[i][j]); instead
  3. You tried to copy a row at temp = *(a+i);, but you can only copy adresses here. temp is going to point a[i], but won't copy it's data.

This code below gives input

1 1 1 1 1 
2 2 2 2 2
3 3 3 3 3
4 4 4 4 4

output

3   3   3   3   3   
4   4   4   4   4   
1   1   1   1   1   
2   2   2   2   2

I have shifted columns like your sample and used a new array b instead of temp

#include<stdio.h>

 int main() {

    int a[4][5],i,j,b[4][5];

    for(i=0;i<=3;i++) {
            for(j=0;j<=4;j++)
                    scanf("%d",(*(a+i)+j));
    }


    for(i=0;i<=3;i++) 
            for(j=0;j<=4;j++)
                {
                    *(*(b+i)+j)=*(*(a+((i-2+4)%4))+j);
                }


     for(i=0;i<=3;i++) {
                   for(j=0;j<=4;j++)
                            printf("%d\t",*(*(b+i)+j));
            printf("\n");
     }

    return 0;

}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks but I am looking fr a solution with pointer arithmetic only..The problem was given to clarify the concepts on pointers.If you could provide me with a solution using pointers only...Thanx in advance. –  Udit Gupta Aug 22 '11 at 13:04
    
OK. b[i][j]=a[(i-2+4)%4][j]; is easily converted to *(*(b+i)+j)=*(*(a+((i-2+4)%4))+j);. Your input-output statements needs no change. –  alimg Aug 22 '11 at 13:20
    
Thanks .. I am clear with your solution but Can you clear me what's wrong with my logic??? (I want to clear the concept on pointers that's why) Please make any necessary modifications in the code.The point is not about getting the solution for the problem but to get clear with the pointer arithmetic used with 2-d array –  Udit Gupta Aug 22 '11 at 13:30
    
Wrong in your code is temp = (a+i); didn't actually got a temporary data. Because (a+i) is still a pointer to pointer. To duplicate an array, you can use temp=memcpy(temp,*(a+i),4) or a loop. Arrays cannot set by = operator; –  alimg Aug 22 '11 at 13:47

Although the concept that you are driving at could be made to work (but there is a LOT wrong with it at the moment) using pointer arithmetic in this context makes the code look very complicated so I wonder why you don't try to rewrite this using array syntax.

For example you could write your output like this:

for(i=0;i<=3;i++) 
{
   for(j=0;j<=4;j++)
       printf("%d\t",a[i][j]);
    printf("\n");     
}

I think this is the easier syntax for a beginner to understand. Similarly the row cycle / swap is far more transparent in this form.

share|improve this answer
1  
actually the problem (where i got it) given to make you comfortable with pointer that why I have used the pointer arithmetic..Can u please provide me a solution using pointers only without using array index (although not suggested) but only to clear the concept how this one going to reflect in memory –  Udit Gupta Aug 22 '11 at 12:58

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