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class Debug
{
    internal static void Assert(bool condition)
    {
        #if DEBUG
        Log.Out("Asserted");
        #endif
    }
}

Will the compiler get rid of calling Assert, as it's empty in Release builds and Optimize checkbox is checked, or there will be a calling empty method overhead?

Regards,

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1  
Why don't you compile it and open the assembly with ILSpy or Reflector. Be sure to let us know what you find! –  Eric Nicholson Aug 22 '11 at 12:50
1  
Any reason you don't want to use a ConditionalAttribute instead? –  Oded Aug 22 '11 at 12:50
1  
you shouldn't worry about this kind of optimization. –  Daniel A. White Aug 22 '11 at 12:50
    
@Daniel: It may not be a micro-optimization depending on how long it takes to evaluate that condition. (Of course the compiler could evaluate the operand and then not call the method...) –  Jon Skeet Aug 22 '11 at 12:54
    
Constructions like this will make your code hard to test or debug. The behavior of your release code is different then your debug code. –  peer Aug 22 '11 at 12:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

No, the C# compiler won't remove the call to Assert - it'll just be an empty method. The JIT compiler may optimize it away in calling code; effectively that's a special case of inlining, where the result of inlining is "nothing to execute". However, note that the argument to Assert will still be evaluated.

However, if you want to make the call itself conditional, a cleaner approach is to change the method to use the System.Diagnostics.Conditional attribute:

[Conditional("DEBUG")]
internal static void Assert(bool condition)
{
    Log.Out("Asserted");
}

This changes the semantics: now the whole method call including argument evaluation will be removed by the C# compiler, so you could have:

Assert(GetCountOfAllRowsInDatabase() != 0);

and in debug mode it would hit the database, but in release mode it wouldn't.

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1  
+1 from me for the conditional attribute, I hadn't seen that before. –  Alex Key Aug 22 '11 at 12:52
    
Maybe add that the compiler removes the call, not the JITter. –  Jonathan Dickinson Aug 22 '11 at 12:57
    
@Jonathan: Yup, will do. –  Jon Skeet Aug 22 '11 at 13:00

According to this, http://www.dotnetperls.com/jit

From what I understand of the article, it appears that the C# compiler does not remove the method from the code. However the JIT compiler removes the calls to the methods.

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AFAIK the whole thing will be optimized away at JIT compile time. The JIT compiler will try to inline the method since it is short and will have noting to inline. On the C# side it will be an empty method. You'll be able to see it in the compiled assembly but since it is internal it should not matter.

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