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I have created a few little programs that export data to a text file using StreamWriter and then I read them back in using StreamReader. This works great and does what I need it to do but I was wondering if there was a way that I could save this information without the user being able to access or modify it either intentionally or unintentionally. An example of something I would have in a text file would be if a checkbox was ticked, when you tick it it outputs "Ticked" to a text file, when the program is re - opened I know what state the form was in when it was closed. I obviously don't want to keep using text files. Does anyone have any ideas on how I can easily store this information without the user being able to modify it? Thank you very much.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The simplest way is to Base-64 encode/decode this text. This is not secure, but will prevent a casual user from modifying the data.

static public string EncodeTo64(string toEncode)
{
  byte[] toEncodeAsBytes
        = System.Text.ASCIIEncoding.ASCII.GetBytes(toEncode);
  string returnValue
        = System.Convert.ToBase64String(toEncodeAsBytes);
  return returnValue;
}

static public string DecodeFrom64(string encodedData)
{
  byte[] encodedDataAsBytes
      = System.Convert.FromBase64String(encodedData);
  string returnValue =
     System.Text.ASCIIEncoding.ASCII.GetString(encodedDataAsBytes);
  return returnValue;
}

EDIT: Real encryption

#region Encryption

        string passPhrase = "Pasword";        // can be any string
        string saltValue = "sALtValue";        // can be any string
        string hashAlgorithm = "SHA1";             // can be "MD5"
        int passwordIterations = 7;                  // can be any number
        string initVector = "~1B2c3D4e5F6g7H8"; // must be 16 bytes
        int keySize = 256;                // can be 192 or 128

        private string Encrypt(string data)
        {
            byte[] bytes = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(this.initVector);
            byte[] rgbSalt = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(this.saltValue);
            byte[] buffer = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(data);
            byte[] rgbKey = new PasswordDeriveBytes(this.passPhrase, rgbSalt, this.hashAlgorithm, this.passwordIterations).GetBytes(this.keySize / 8);
            RijndaelManaged managed = new RijndaelManaged();
            managed.Mode = CipherMode.CBC;
            ICryptoTransform transform = managed.CreateEncryptor(rgbKey, bytes);
            MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream();
            CryptoStream stream2 = new CryptoStream(stream, transform, CryptoStreamMode.Write);
            stream2.Write(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
            stream2.FlushFinalBlock();
            byte[] inArray = stream.ToArray();
            stream.Close();
            stream2.Close();
            return Convert.ToBase64String(inArray);
        }

        private string Decrypt(string data)
        {
            byte[] bytes = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(this.initVector);
            byte[] rgbSalt = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(this.saltValue);
            byte[] buffer = Convert.FromBase64String(data);
            byte[] rgbKey = new PasswordDeriveBytes(this.passPhrase, rgbSalt, this.hashAlgorithm, this.passwordIterations).GetBytes(this.keySize / 8);
            RijndaelManaged managed = new RijndaelManaged();
            managed.Mode = CipherMode.CBC;
            ICryptoTransform transform = managed.CreateDecryptor(rgbKey, bytes);
            MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream(buffer);
            CryptoStream stream2 = new CryptoStream(stream, transform, CryptoStreamMode.Read);
            byte[] buffer5 = new byte[buffer.Length];
            int count = stream2.Read(buffer5, 0, buffer5.Length);
            stream.Close();
            stream2.Close();
            return Encoding.UTF8.GetString(buffer5, 0, count);
        }
        #endregion
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I will use the Base-64 encode/decode for this as it sounds as though it will achieve what I need to do. Could I read a file with this - static public string DecodeFrom64(string pathoffile) using the path of the file as the argument rather than a variable? I am used to using StreamReader so wondered if this would apply? –  Bali C Aug 22 '11 at 14:27
    
Also if I were to use the above mentioned method where would I specify the location of the file and what extension would I use? –  Bali C Aug 22 '11 at 14:28
    
You can modify the methods to read from a file. The actual methods which do the encoding/decoding for base64 work on array of bytes. Those are just sample code on how to do it from a string. In general, I keep "helper" methods like these in its own Utility class which then can be called from anywhere in the program. You can use this: System.IO.StreamReader myFile = new System.IO.StreamReader("c:\\test.txt"); string myString = myFile.ReadToEnd(); and System.IO.StreamWriter file = new System.IO.StreamWriter("c:\\test.txt"); file.WriteLine(lines); file.Close(); –  Leon Aug 22 '11 at 14:33
    
Sweet, thats brilliant, thanks so much for your time! –  Bali C Aug 22 '11 at 14:48
    
Bali, as @Leon mentioned, base-64 encoding isn't secure. If you use one of the methods mentioned in this post, use the encryption one. –  Michael Aug 22 '11 at 15:13

You should call ProtectedData.Protect to encrypt the data using a per-user key.

Note that it wouldn't be very hard for a skilled user to decrypt and modify the data.
Anything that your program does on the user's machine can be done by the user too.

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You can add a checksum or hash to the file - if the file contents doesn't agree with the checksum, you know it was tampered with.

If it is important that users can't read the contents of the file, you can encrypt it.

I don't believe you can make a file that can't be tampered with (a savvy user could use a hex editor and change it, for example) - the best you can do is detect such tampering.

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2  
You can't even detect such tampering. The user can add the same checksum. –  SLaks Aug 22 '11 at 14:13
    
Thanks for the suggetions, my priority is that the data isn't stored in plain text, like when you open a DLL or EXE in notepad, it is all scrambled and un readable (I know this is because of the way it is complied but you get what I mean - just so the user isn't tempted to break anything just because they can read it) thanks. –  Bali C Aug 22 '11 at 14:17
    
If I encrypted the text would it not show in plain text or not be accessible? I take it the app would still be able to read this though? Do you have some sample code to show me how to encrypt something? Thanks very much –  Bali C Aug 22 '11 at 14:20
    
@Bali C - encrypting means that it can't be read without being decrypted first. I suggest you look through the MSDN pages for the System.Security.Cryptography namespace. The topic is large and any "simple" example will be misleading. –  Oded Aug 22 '11 at 14:24
    
Ok, thanks for your help. –  Bali C Aug 22 '11 at 14:29

You can use the Ionic zip libraries to zip those text files. If necessary you could also use features of Ionic zip like password protection and encryption. And you'll still be able to open the file (with zipping applications like, for example, 7zip) manually yourself using the same settings you used to create it in the first place.

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That won't help. –  SLaks Aug 22 '11 at 14:16
    
Because the user can still open it with any ZIP program. –  SLaks Aug 22 '11 at 14:19
    
not if there's a decent password on it, and choosing a non-zip extension for the file prevents quite some average users from trying –  mtijn Aug 22 '11 at 14:21
    
True, although the user can decompile the program and find the password. –  SLaks Aug 22 '11 at 14:23
    
but that's an altogether different issue.. that depends on how well you protect the password within your own application, or wherever it is stored –  mtijn Aug 22 '11 at 14:25

If a program can access the information, a user usually can too. However you can produce data the user will not immediately understand.

I would start by creating a class that holds all state information you want to save, isolating the problem. Coincidentally, the BinaryFormatter class will then allow you to easily save and load this class to/from a file. I don't know if it's results are "unreadable enough" - if not, apply Base64 encoding like Leon mentioned.

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While you could base64 encode or even fully encrypt your configuration data (with SHA1 or MD5) as already suggested, I think good practice would be to work with the framework classes dealing with configuration data (Configuration under the System.Configuration namespace) and it's built in ability to encrypt data (via the ProtectSection method of the ConfigurationSection class).

First of all you should declare and initialize an instance:

using System.Configuration;
...
static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Configuration config;

        config = ConfigurationManager.OpenExeConfiguration(/*path to config file*/); //Use ConfigurationManager.OpenMachineConfiguration(/*path to config file*/) when opening machine configuration
...

After that you need to define a custom configuration section that defines your configuration (msdn example)

Once you've done that you just need to initialize an instance of your custom configuration section and add it to the configuration file using this code:

isTicked = config.Sections.Add("isTicked", customSection);

To encrypt the section you just added use this code (with further examples in both VB.NET and C# found here):

config.Sections["isTicked"].SectionInformation.ProtectSection("protection provider");

The "DPAPIProtectedConfigurationProvider" and "RSAProtectedConfigurationProvider" are built in by default.

Once you want to decrypt the section use this code:

config.Sections["isTicked"].SectionInformation.UnprotectSection();

To stress a point - encryption and decryption both take effect only after you save the configuration file

To save the file, use the code:

config.Save(); //config.SaveAs("string") is also available

Further information about the relevant classes and methods can be found in the msdn, starting with the Configuration class page linked above.

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That's great, thanks, I will have a look at this +1 –  Bali C Aug 23 '11 at 8:17

Try this code to encrypt and decrypt your text! It is quite easy and strong I think...

public static class Crypto
{
    private static readonly byte[] IVa = new byte[] { 0x0b, 0x0c, 0x0d, 0x0e, 0x0f, 0x11, 0x11, 0x12, 0x13, 0x14, 0x15, 0x16, 0x17 };


    public static string Encrypt(this string text, string salt)
    {
        try
        {
            using (Aes aes = new AesManaged())
            {
                Rfc2898DeriveBytes deriveBytes = new Rfc2898DeriveBytes(Encoding.UTF8.GetString(IVa, 0, IVa.Length), Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(salt));
                aes.Key = deriveBytes.GetBytes(128 / 8);
                aes.IV = aes.Key;
                using (MemoryStream encryptionStream = new MemoryStream())
                {
                    using (CryptoStream encrypt = new CryptoStream(encryptionStream, aes.CreateEncryptor(), CryptoStreamMode.Write))
                    {
                        byte[] cleanText = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(text);
                        System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(String.Concat("Before encryption text data size: ", text.Length.ToString()));
                        System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(String.Concat("Before encryption byte data size: ", cleanText.Length.ToString()));
                        encrypt.Write(cleanText, 0, cleanText.Length);
                        encrypt.FlushFinalBlock();
                    }

                    byte[] encryptedData = encryptionStream.ToArray();
                    string encryptedText = Convert.ToBase64String(encryptedData);

                    System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(String.Concat("Encrypted text data size: ", encryptedText.Length.ToString()));
                    System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(String.Concat("Encrypted byte data size: ", encryptedData.Length.ToString()));

                    return encryptedText;
                }
            }
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            return String.Empty;
        }
    }

    public static string Decrypt(this string text, string salt)
    {
        try
        {
            using (Aes aes = new AesManaged())
            {
                Rfc2898DeriveBytes deriveBytes = new Rfc2898DeriveBytes(Encoding.UTF8.GetString(IVa, 0, IVa.Length), Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(salt));
                aes.Key = deriveBytes.GetBytes(128 / 8);
                aes.IV = aes.Key;

                using (MemoryStream decryptionStream = new MemoryStream())
                {
                    using (CryptoStream decrypt = new CryptoStream(decryptionStream, aes.CreateDecryptor(), CryptoStreamMode.Write))
                    {
                        byte[] encryptedData = Convert.FromBase64String(text);

                        System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(String.Concat("Encrypted text data size: ", text.Length.ToString()));
                        System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(String.Concat("Encrypted byte data size: ", encryptedData.Length.ToString()));

                        decrypt.Write(encryptedData, 0, encryptedData.Length);
                        decrypt.Flush();
                    }

                    byte[] decryptedData = decryptionStream.ToArray();
                    string decryptedText = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(decryptedData, 0, decryptedData.Length);

                    System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(String.Concat("After decryption text data size: ", decryptedText.Length.ToString()));
                    System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(String.Concat("After decryption byte data size: ", decryptedData.Length.ToString()));

                    return decryptedText;
                }
            }
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            return String.Empty;
        }
    }
}
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