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A Story can be given an Award (One) by a Nominator. So, my Nominator entity has the following method:

public void GiveAward(StoryBase story)
{
    if (story.HasAward())        
        throw new InvalidOperationException("...");

    if (BusinessUnit.HasAwardsToGive() == false)
        throw new ...

    story.SetAward(new Award(AwardType.Results));
}

Something is not sitting right with me on how I have this implemented thus far. SetAward() is publicly visible, so it can be called from someone outside of Nominator, but the Nominator has to know if the story has already been given an award.

Any ideas would be great!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is another suggestion.

Have Story take a Nominator as input.

public class Story
{
    public void GiveAward(Nominator nominator)
    {
        if (this.Award != null)
            throw new ...
        var award = nominator.CreateAwardForStory(this); 
        this.SetAward(award); // SetAward can now be private
    }
}
public class Nominator
{
    public Award CreateAwardForStory(Story story)
    {
        if (BusinessUnit.HasAwardsToGive() == false)
            throw new ...
        return new Award(AwardType.Results);
    }
}

Now, if we assume that the CreateAwardForStory(...) function guarantees to return a new Award instance (the name implies that it does), the Story also implicitly validates that the same Award instance is not given to multiple stories.

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that makes sense. what always trips me up is figuring out where it makes sense to add the behavior when validation needs to take place. i guess its just a learning experience. thank you. –  Marco Aug 22 '11 at 15:46

Wouldn't it make more sense for SetAward to test whether an award has been given? Remember: tell, don't ask.

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Yes, but I left out some of the logic. Nominator has a BusinessUnit which has all of the available Award Types so the Nominator would need to check with its Business Unit. –  Marco Aug 22 '11 at 15:05
    
I'm confused as to why BusinessUnit needs to be involved at all. Does it merely contain AwardTypes, or does it also somehow determine how many awards are available to be handed out? In any case, wouldn't you do the check before invoking the Nominator? Why even attempt to give out an award if there's none to give? –  KevinM1 Aug 22 '11 at 15:42
    
A business unit has a collection of Award Types, that's it. in my tests i was needing to make sure an invalid award cannot be given. –  Marco Aug 22 '11 at 16:03

Instead of letting the story have the award, perhaps the award should point to the story?

public class Award
{
    public Award(Story awardedTo, Nominator awardedBy)
    { ... }
}

Not knowing your domain (thus knowing what a story and an award is), I have difficulty knowing what makes sense, but that model would allow a story to receive multiple award. If the story was a movie, and an award could be Golden Globe or Academy Award, etc., then that model also allows for a story to have multiple awards. But since you specifically disallowed that in your original code, then maybe that is not valid in your domain.

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Correct, a story is only allowed one award (two different types). so in my database (i know...its a detail) my story table has a StoryAwardId foreign key for a 1:1 relation. –  Marco Aug 22 '11 at 15:11

You should really be following the tell don't ask principle and just Set the award and throw the exception if that's the desired behavior in the StoryBase class

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sorry, i revised my question. i did not have all the logic listed out. –  Marco Aug 22 '11 at 15:09

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