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Good day,

I have trouble finding the problem with the function below. The first parameters is a string containing ANSI color codes and the second parameter is a boolean.

If the boolean is set to false, a full remove is made on the string.

If the boolean is set to true, a loop convert every color codes into something easier for me to parse later.

I suspect the RegExp being the problem as it is confused between 1;33 and 0;31 for some reason.

var colorReplace = function( input, replace ) {
        var replaceColors = {
            "0;31" : "{r",
            "1;31" : "{R",

            "0;32" : "{g",
            "1;32" : "{G",

            "0;33" : "{y",
            "1;33" : "{Y",

            "0;34" : "{b",
            "1;34" : "{B",

            "0;35" : "{m",
            "1;35" : "{M",

            "0;36" : "{c",
            "1;36" : "{C",

            "0;37" : "{w",
            "1;37" : "{W",

            "1;30" : "{*",

            "0" : "{x"
        };

        if ( replace )
        {
            for( k in replaceColors )
            {
                //console.log( "\033\[" + k + "m" + replaceColors[ k ] );
                var re = new RegExp( "\033\[[" + k + "]*m", "g" );

                input = input.replace( re, replaceColors[ k ] );
            }
        } else {
            input = input.replace( /\033\[[0-9;]*m/g, "" );
        }

        return input;
    };

console.log( "abcd\033[1;32mefgh\033[1;33mijkl\033[0m" );
console.log( colorReplace( "abcd\033[1;32mefgh\033[1;33mijkl", true ) );

The actual output is:

enter image description here

Where it should be abcd{Gefgh{Yijkl

Anyone know what's wrong now?

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The second parameter of the replaceColor is a boolean and it will either replace all the color codes with an easy-to-read (IMO) and easy-to-parse string or if false is used, it will remove all colorcodes found. –  Cybrix Aug 22 '11 at 18:42
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

Your Regex was wrong. It should be "\\033\\[" + k + "m", not "\033\[[" + k + "]*m".

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Indeed! Thanks! –  Cybrix Aug 26 '11 at 4:02
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You can use octal codes in both strings and regexps

x = "\033[1mHello Bold World!\033[0m\n";
x = x.replace(/\033\[[0-9;]*m/,"");
print(x);
share|improve this answer
    
This works! What would be the solution using a RegExp object ? I am thinking about either removing ( your solution ) or replacing with an equivalent/easier to remember and parse string. –  Cybrix Aug 22 '11 at 17:56
1  
@Cybrix: /\033\[[0-9;]*m/ equals RegExp("\033\[[0-9;]*m"). –  Álvaro G. Vicario Aug 22 '11 at 17:59
    
@Àlvaro, Thank you. Then, if I want to use a variable inside the RegExp parameter this should work: var byellow = "1;33"; var re = new RegExp( "\033\[" + byellow + "*m", "g" ); string = string.replace( re, "{Y}" ); ? –  Cybrix Aug 22 '11 at 18:03
    
Do you have any ideas how to solve my problem? –  Cybrix Aug 25 '11 at 19:48
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