Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a method that iterates the fields of a class, returning their values as a CSV. I need a way to give classes access to this method in a generic fashion.

For some reason, Statics must derive from object or you get a compile error. In this case, deriving from a different base class does increase code re-useability for me. Is there another way to accomplish my goal?

I believe the only choice I have is to make my static class an instance class.

//a data container used for Mocking in inversion of control
public class FieldContainer : ReflectionHelper<FieldContainer>
{
    public static string Field1 = "Some Data";
    public static string Field2 = "Persons Name";
    public static string Field3 = "3030 Plane Ave.";
}

    public class ReflectionHelper<T>
    {
    public static string ToCSV()
    {
        StringBuilder fieldCollector = new StringBuilder();

        Type type = typeof(T);
        FieldInfo[] fields = type.GetFields();
        foreach (FieldInfo f in fields)
        {
            fieldCollector.Append(f.GetValue(null) + ",");
        }

        return fieldCollector.ToString();
    }
    }
share|improve this question
2  
why are you doing it this way - this is smelly. –  Daniel A. White Aug 22 '11 at 15:18
    
@Daniel A. White - Which part has code smell? The reflection part, CSV conversion, Field container...? –  P.Brian.Mackey Aug 22 '11 at 15:21
    
the reflection. –  Daniel A. White Aug 22 '11 at 15:22
    
Perhaps the "code smell" is due to the fact that these classes are a bit unusual in that their sole purpose is in helping me Mock my DB. I implement ViewModels in MVC and these Mock classes assist in setting up IoC with Ninject. I keep my ViewModel simple, with string and string[]. These classes let me define simple Models to populate said ViewModel without the needless complexity of constructing complex types with textual data and strong typing via XML. –  P.Brian.Mackey Aug 22 '11 at 16:37
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your code is perfectly valid (at least technically). Your class FieldContainer is not a static class and therefore it can derive from ReflectionHelper<T>.

However, you normally would not implement the method ToCSV in a base class, because it can basically work on ANY class. Because you want to work on static members, an extension method isn't the best way either. The simplest and cleanest way to do it, will be to have a static helper class that implements this method:

public static class ReflectionHelper
{
    public static string ToCSV<T>()
    {
        StringBuilder fieldCollector = new StringBuilder();

        Type type = typeof(T);
        FieldInfo[] fields = type.GetFields();
        foreach (FieldInfo f in fields)
        {
            fieldCollector.Append(f.GetValue(null) + ",");
        }

        return fieldCollector.ToString();
    }
}

You can use it like this:

var csv = ReflectionHelper.ToCSV<FieldContainer>();

However, I fail to see, why you would want to implement something like that at all. It doesn't seem to make too much sense.

share|improve this answer
    
My original choice was an extension method, but I had similar problems with Static. If converting to a instance method is the best choice, then Extensions come back into play. I am just a little hesitant because this Class is just a list of static fields. –  P.Brian.Mackey Aug 22 '11 at 15:22
    
@P.Brian: Please see updated answer –  Daniel Hilgarth Aug 22 '11 at 15:24
add comment

You could form it as an extension method, as such:

public static class ReflectionHelperExtensions
{
    public static string ToCSV<T>(this T instance)
    {
        var type = instance.GetType();
        var fields = type.GetFields();
        var fieldCollector = new StringBuilder();        
        foreach (FieldInfo f in fields)
        {
            fieldCollector.Append(f.GetValue(null) + ",");
        }
        return fieldCollector.ToString();
    }
}

This way, your field container classes don't need to derive from any given type, as this applies to all derivatives of object.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Have you concidered using an extension method?

public static class ReflectionExtensions
{
     public static string ToCSV(this object input)
     { 
         StringBuilder fieldCollector = new StringBuilder();

         Type type = input.GetType();
         FieldInfo[] fields = type.GetFields();
         foreach (FieldInfo f in fields)
         {
             fieldCollector.Append(f.GetValue(null) + ",");
         }

         return fieldCollector.ToString();
    }
}

Then you could simply call the following on any object:

FieldContainer c = new FieldContainer();
string result = c.ToCSV();
share|improve this answer
add comment

It's fine if you have the class as an instanced type.

public abstract class ReflectionHelper<T>
{
    protected ReflectionHelper()
    { }


    public static string ToCsv(string delimiter = ",")
    {
        var fieldCollector = new StringBuilder();

        var type = typeof(T);
        var fields = type.GetFields();
        foreach (var f in fields)
        {
            fieldCollector.Append(f.GetValue(null) + delimiter);
        }

        return fieldCollector.ToString();
    }
}

public class Something : ReflectionHelper<Something>
{
    protected Something() : base()
    {

    }
    public static string Field1 = "Some Data";
    public static string Field2 = "Persons Name";
    public static string Field3 = "3030 Plane Ave.";
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.