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I'd like to know if there is a way to copy DOM nodes so that one can both slice the textual part of a node and keep the nodes contained within that node intact. I have a function that takes a paragraph, separates the first letter from it, then creates a new node, adds to it that letter wrapped in a new node, then inserts the rest of the text. The trouble is, when that paragraph contains other HTML elements they get flattened to a string because I extract the text using innerHTML. I need them to remain DOM nodes. Here's the function:

function createDropCappedParagraph(article) {
    pars = article.getElementsByTagName("p");
    first_par = pars[0];
    var text = first_par.innerHTML;
    text = text.trim();
    var first_letter = text.substr(0,1)
    text = text.slice(1);
    var t = document.createTextNode(text);
    var dropcap = document.createElement("span");
    dropcap.className = "dropcap";
    dropcap.innerHTML = first_letter
    var dcpar = document.createElement("p");
    dcpar.style.position = "relative";
    dcpar.appendChild(dropcap);
    dcpar.appendChild(t);
    article.insertBefore(dcpar, pars[0]);
    article.removeChild(pars[1]);
}

and here's what it looks like when this effect is applied, notice the flattened a href links in the first paragraph:

http://legibilis.heroku.com/start-here

Thanks, James

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your problem is that you use this string to create a TextNode, and therefore all special characters (such as <, >, ", etc.) get escaped (meaning they are converted to their safe counterparts: &lt;, &gt;, &quot;, etc.).

Here's an idea for a simple workaround:

Instead of creating a TextNode called t, create a normal HTML node called t. For example, make this a 'div' tag. Then, modify this tag's .innerHTML field: t.innerHTML = text;. This shouldn't escape the content, AFAIK, and the div tag shouldn't bother you much (it's inline by default).

EDIT:
If you're using jQuery, $(text) will give you the jQuery element (or elements) for the content of text.

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thanks for replying, I'll give it a try. Btw, I though that 'div' was a block element by default? (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Span_and_div) –  user906230 Aug 24 '11 at 12:31
    
@user906230: hmm, seems you might be correct. I mis-read it in some website. If my answer is good, an upvote and "accept" could be nice :) Thanks. –  Eran Zimmerman Aug 25 '11 at 7:41

It worked, thank you:

function createDropCappedParagraph(article) {
    pars = article.getElementsByTagName("p");
    first_par = pars[0];
    var text = first_par.innerHTML;
    text = text.trim();
    var first_letter = text.substr(0,1)
    text = text.slice(1);
    var t = document.createElement("span");
    t.innerHTML = text;
    var dropcap = document.createElement("span");
    dropcap.className = "dropcap";
    dropcap.innerHTML = first_letter
    var dcpar = document.createElement("p");
    dcpar.style.position = "relative";
    dcpar.appendChild(dropcap);
    dcpar.appendChild(t);
    article.insertBefore(dcpar, pars[0]);
    article.removeChild(pars[1]);
}
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