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I have the following functor and I had included it in my main program

template<class T> struct Comp: public binary_function<T, T, int>
{
 int operator()(const T& a, const T& b) const
 {
   return (a>b) ? 1: (a<b) ? -1 :0;
 }
};

It wasn't giving any error when it was in the .cpp, but now when I moved it to my .h, it gives me the following error:

testclass.h: At global scope:
testclass.h:50:59: error: expected template-name before ‘<’ token
testclass.h:50:59: error: expected ‘{’ before ‘<’ token
testclass.h:50:59: error: expected unqualified-id before ‘<’ token

So, I rewrote it as:

template<class T> T Comp: public binary_function<T, T, int>
{
 int operator()(const T& a, const T& b) const
 {
   return (a>b) ? 1: (a<b) ? -1 :0;
 }
};

and now i get the following error:

testclass.h: At global scope:
testclass.h:50:30: error: expected initializer before ‘:’ token

any suggestion on how I can fix it? thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The original error is probably with binary_function: missing the include or not considering that it is in namespace std.

#include <functional>

and

std::binary_function<T, T, int>
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not including the std:: was my mistake....I had the include...thx UncleBens :-) –  itcplpl Aug 22 '11 at 16:58

template<class T> T Comp: public binary_function<T, T, int> is not valid syntax, the first one is correct. The error is probably about binary_function — make sure you included the header and it should be std::binary_function.

Also, binary_function is largely useless, especially in C++11.

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yep, std:: was the issue :-(...so if binary_function is useless, do I just eliminate it or is it replaced by something else –  itcplpl Aug 22 '11 at 16:59
    
@itcplpl: If you use bind (whether boost::bind or std::bind), it's safe to just get rid of it. –  Cat Plus Plus Aug 22 '11 at 17:01
    
ok, I'll work with std::bind - thx:-) –  itcplpl Aug 22 '11 at 17:02
template<class T> T Comp : public binary_function<T, T, int>
               //^^^ what is this?

What is that? That should be struct (or class).

Also, have you forgotten to include <functional> header file in which binary_function is defined?

Include <functional>. And use std::binary_function, instead of binary_function as:

#include <functional> //must include

template<class T> struct Comp: public std::binary_function<T, T, int>
{                                   //^^^^^ qualify it with std::
 int operator()(const T& a, const T& b) const
 {
   return (a>b) ? 1: (a<b) ? -1 :0;
 }
};
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yep, fixed that....thx Nawaz –  itcplpl Aug 22 '11 at 17:00
    
can you also tell me what the error is with this code: class cmp_test { public: bool operator()(const test& a, const test& b) { return a < b; } }; I get the following error: In member function ‘bool cmp_test::operator()(const test&, const test&)’: test.h:39:14: error: no match for ‘operator<’ in ‘a < b’. –  itcplpl Aug 22 '11 at 17:22
    
@itcplpl: That error means, you've to implement operator< for the class type test. Have you defined it? If no, define it. If yes, then what is the signature? –  Nawaz Aug 22 '11 at 17:25
    
yes, I have defined it, here's the code: bool operator<(const test& a, const test& b) { if (a.geta()<b.getb()) return true; else { if (a.geta()==b.getb()) { if(a.getan()<b.getan()) return true; else { if (a.getan()==b.getan()) { if(a.getd()<b.getd()) return true; } } } } return false; }; –  itcplpl Aug 22 '11 at 17:29
    
@itcplpl: Is it member function, or free function? Also, are geta and getb() const member functions? Better post the code at ideone.com or in your question. –  Nawaz Aug 22 '11 at 17:32

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