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I'm seeing an issue where I have a UDP client & server exchanging messages frequently and the memory usage for both entities is increasing at a rate of approximately 8K per second (althoughly ultimately, this depends on the rate of commuinications between them) as observed in the Task Manager.

To illustrate this as simply as possible, I've created a sample based upon the MSDN Using UDP Services http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/tst0kwb1.aspx.

The server:

using System;
using System.Net;
using System.Net.Sockets;
using System.Text;

public class UDPListener
{
private const int listenPort = 11000;

private static void StartListener()
{
    bool done = false;

    UInt32 count = 0;
    UdpClient listener = new UdpClient(listenPort);
    IPEndPoint groupEP = new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Loopback, listenPort);

    try
    {
        while (!done)
        {
            byte[] bytes = listener.Receive(ref groupEP);

            if ("last packet" == System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetString(bytes))
            {
                done = true;
                Console.WriteLine("Done! - rx packet count: " + Convert.ToString(count));
            }
            else
            {
                count++;
            }
        }

    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(e.ToString());
    }
    finally
    {
        listener.Close();
    }
}

public static int Main()
{
    StartListener();

    return 0;
}

}

And the client:

using System;
using System.Net;
using System.Net.Sockets;
using System.Text;

namespace UDPSender
{
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Socket s = new Socket(AddressFamily.InterNetwork, SocketType.Dgram,
            ProtocolType.Udp);

        IPAddress broadcast = IPAddress.Parse(IPAddress.Loopback.ToString());

        byte[] sendbuf = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes("test string");
        IPEndPoint ep = new IPEndPoint(broadcast, 11000);

        for (int i = 0; i < 500; i++)
        {
           s.SendTo(sendbuf, ep);

            System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(50);
        }

        s.SendTo(Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes("last packet"), ep);

        s.Dispose();
    }
}
}

I've tried both using the Socket interface directly and UDPClient, dropping the client socket after each transmission, explicit GC.Collect etc. to no avail.

Any ideas what's going on here - I can't belive this is a fundamental issue with .NET, there must be an issue with my code/the sample....

share|improve this question
    
@rw: Don't use Task Manager to check for memory usage. Use Perfmon (comes with Windows) or something like Process Explorer from Sysinternals and monitor the 'Private bytes' metric value. –  Andy Aug 22 '11 at 17:15
    
@Andy: The Virtual Memory Size column in Task Manager is the same as Private Bytes. –  Paul Ruane Aug 22 '11 at 17:18
    
@rw: After running all your rx/tx, can you sleep the threads for a while to ensure they have sent all outstanding packages and take memory usage then? –  Johannes Rudolph Aug 22 '11 at 17:21
    
Andy,Paul: You are correct in the assumption that I'm using Task Manager to determine memory usage. Johannes: I'm pretty sure it's all being consumed, but to be sure I've added a semaphore to ensure the client waits.Breaking the consumption down, I find that the both entities working set increases over the course of the run. The client's private bytes also increases after so many sends (roughly 200 bytes per 1000 sends). If I explicitly GC.Collect after n sends I can reduce the effective private byte usage to zero. If n is too large, subsequent calls to collect have no effect.Why is this? –  rw. Aug 23 '11 at 15:42
    
maybe you should create the byte variable outside of the while. –  Rafa Dec 6 '12 at 15:34

1 Answer 1

Try this :

bytes = null;
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately this did not work. However, as commented above, I could improve the private byte usage of the server by ditching the UDPClient and using a raw socket and dropping an explicit collect in. –  rw. Aug 23 '11 at 15:52

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