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I have a class which makes requests to a remote API. I'd like to be able to reduce the number of calls I'm making. Some of the methods in my class make the same API calls (but for different reasons), so I'ld like the ability for them to 'share' a cached API response.

I'm not entirely sure if it's more Pythonic to use optional parameters or to use multiple methods, as the methods have some required parameters if they are making an API call.

Here are the approches as I see them, which do you think is best?

class A:

  def a_method( item_id, cached_item_api_response = None):
     """ Seems awkward having to supplied item_id even 
         if cached_item_api_response is given
     """
     api_response = None 
     if cached_item_api_response:
         api_response = cached_item_api_response
     else:
         api_response = ... # make api call using item_id

     ... #do stuff

Or this:

class B:

    def a_method(item_id = None, cached_api_response = None):
     """ Seems awkward as it makes no sense NOT to supply EITHER
         item_id or cached_api_response
     """
     api_response = None 
     if cached_item_api_response:
         api_response = cached_item_api_response
     elif item_id:
         api_response = ... # make api call using item_id
     else:
         #ERROR

     ... #do stuff

Or is this more appropriate?

class C:
   """Seems even more awkward to have different method calls"""   

   def a_method(item_id):
      api_response = ... # make api call using item_id
      api_response_logic(api_response)

   def b_method(cached_api_response):
      api_response_logic(cached_api_response)

   def api_response_logic(api_response):
      ... # do stuff
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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Normally when writing method one could argue that a method / object should do one thing and it should do it well. If your method get more and more parameters which require more and more ifs in your code that probably means that your code is doing more then one thing. Especially if those parameters trigger totally different behavior. Instead maybe the same behavior could be produced by having different classes and having them overload methods.

Maybe you could use something like:

class BaseClass(object):
    def a_method(self, item_id):
        response = lookup_response(item_id)
        return response

class CachingClass(BaseClass):
    def a_method(self, item_id):
        if item_id in cache:
            return item_from_cache
        return super(CachingClass, self).a_method(item_id)

    def uncached_method(self, item_id)
        return super(CachingClass, self).a_method(item_id)

That way you can split the logic of how to lookup the response and the caching while also making it flexible for the user of the API to decide if they want the caching capabilities or not.

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Thanks for the edit, but normally I would suggest using delegation instead of inheritance as it makes the classes more flexible. –  Rickard Aug 22 '11 at 18:51
    
If this wasn't your intention, sorry for changing it. It was just a Python question and your code wasn't Python so I made my best guess -- feel free to roll it back or change it to reflect your intention. (Good answer any way, already got my +1) –  agf Aug 24 '11 at 0:47

There is nothing wrong with the method used in your class B. To make it more obvious at a glance that you actually need to include either item_id or cached_api_response, I would put the error checking first:

class B:

    def a_method(item_id = None, cached_api_response = None):
        """Requires either item_id or cached_api_response"""

        if not ((item_id == None) ^ (cached_api_response == None)):
            #error

        # or, if you want to allow both,
        if (item_id == None) and (cached_api_response == None):
            # error

        # you don't actually have to do this on one line
        # also don't use it if cached_item_api_response can evaluate to 'False'
        api_response = cached_item_api_response or # make api call using item_id

        ... #do stuff
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Ultimately this is a judgement that must be made for each situation. I would ask myself, which of these two more closely fits:

  1. Two completely different algorithms or actions, with completely different semantics, even though they may be passed similar information
  2. A single conceptual idea, with consistent semantics, but with nuance based on input

If the first is closest, go with separate methods. If the second is closest, go with optional arguments. You might even implement a single method by testing the type of the argument(s) to avoid passing additional arguments.

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This is an OO anti-pattern.

class API_Connection(object):
    def do_something_with_api_response(self, response):
        ...

    def do_something_else_with_api_response(self, response):
        ...

You have two methods on an instance and you're passing state between them explicitly? Why are these methods and not bare functions in a module?

Instead, think about using encapsulation to help you by having the instance of the class own the api response.

For example:

class API_Connection(object):
    def __init__(self, api_url):
        self._url = api_url
        self.cached_response = None

    @property
    def response(self):
        """Actually use the _url and get the response when needed."""
        if self._cached_response is None:
            # actually calculate self._cached_response by making our
            # remote call, etc
            self._cached_response = self._get_api_response(self._url)
        return self._cached_response

    def _get_api_response(self, api_param1, ...):
        """Make the request and return the api's response"""

    def do_something_with_api_response(self):
        # just use self.response
        do_something(self.response)

    def do_something_else_with_api_response(self):
        # just use self.response
        do_something_else(self.response)

You have caching and any method which needs this response can run in any order without making multiple api requests because the first method that needs self.response will calculate it and every other will use the cached value. Hopefully it's easy to imagine extending this with multiple URLs or RPC calls. If you have a need for a lot of methods that cache their return values like response above then you should look into a memoization decorator for your methods.

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I like the overall concept, but I see some dificulties in getting from the do_something methods to the _get_api_response method if there are parameters that differ between calls. Still worth a +1, though. –  Ethan Furman Sep 30 '11 at 21:45

The cached response should be saved in the instance, not passed around like a bag of Skittles -- what if you dropped it?

Is item_id unique per instance, or can an instance make queries for more than one? If it can have more than one, I'd go with something like this:

class A(object):

    def __init__(self):
        self._cache = dict()

    def a_method( item_id ):
        """Gets api_reponse from cache (cache may have to get a current response).
        """
        api_response = self._get_cached_response( item_id )
        ... #do stuff

    def b_method( item_id ):
        """'nother method (just for show)
        """
        api_response = self._get_cached_response( item_id )
        ... #do other stuff

    def _get_cached_response( self, item_id ):
        if item_id in self._cache:
            return self._cache[ item_id ]
        response = self._cache[ item_id ] = api_call( item_id, ... )
        return response

    def refresh_response( item_id ):
        if item_id in self._cache:
            del self._cache[ item_id ]
        self._get_cached_response( item_id )

And if you may have to get the most current info about item_id, you can have a refresh_response method.

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