Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I found that I can use $env:Path within PowerShell to see my current system path. However, everything runs together on one line. Is there a way to pipe the output of $env:Path to another command that will print each path value separately (i.e. printing on a new line for everything that is delimited by a semi-colon)?

Currently it prints something like this:

C:\Some Test Directory\With\Some\Files\In\It;C:\Some Test Directory\With\Some\Files\In\It;C:\Some Test Directory\With\Some\Files\In\It;C:\Some Test Directory\With\Some\Files\In\It;C:\Some Test Directory\With\Some\Files\In\It;

I'd rather have something like this:

C:\Some Test Directory\With\Some\Files\In\It
C:\Some Test Directory\With\Some\Files\In\It
C:\Some Test Directory\With\Some\Files\In\It
C:\Some Test Directory\With\Some\Files\In\It
C:\Some Test Directory\With\Some\Files\In\It
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted
$env:Path.split(";")

PS C:\Users\user> $env:Path.split(";")
C:\Program Files (x86)\Haskell\bin
C:\Program Files (x86)\Haskell Platform\2011.2.0.1\lib\extralibs\bin
C:\Program Files (x86)\Haskell Platform\2011.2.0.1\bin
C:\Program Files (x86)\NVIDIA Corporation\PhysX\Common
C:\Windows\system32
...

Works for me.

share|improve this answer
    
So easy, thanks! –  Ben McCormack Aug 22 '11 at 17:46

On Unix you can do this with simply

echo $path | tr ";" "\n"

You can emulate this workflow on Windows with either of the following:

EITHER

Install gnu coreutils and add the bin directory to your system path

OR

  1. Add a folder for your command line tools to your system path. E.g, "C:\Program Files (x86)\bin\"

  2. Download tr as part of the powertools ported from unix. Extract them somewhere else. (E.g, "C:\Program Files (x86)\bin\perl\"

  3. Add a bat file called tr.bat with these contents to your bin folder:

@echo off

perl "C:\Program Files (x86)\bin\perl\tr" %*

(Path should match where you extracted the perl tools)


Result

C:\>echo %path% | tr ";" "\n"
C:\Program Files (x86)\bin\
C:\Perl\site\bin
C:\Perl\bin
C:\WINDOWS\system32
C:\WINDOWS
C:\WINDOWS\System32\Wbem
C:\WINDOWS\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\
C:\Python27
...
share|improve this answer
    
While this will work, this is WAY overkill for something that you can already easily do from within PowerShell. –  SpellingD Jan 30 '13 at 17:04
    
Perhaps, but I offer this to those (like myself) who are from a unix environment and have no interest/motivation to learn powershell. –  RJFalconer Jan 31 '13 at 9:30
    
Sorry; that sounds a bit condescending. What I mean is I can now pipe that through "grep Windows" and get all the Windows sub dirs in my Path. I have no idea how to do this in Powershell. –  RJFalconer Jan 31 '13 at 10:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.