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In my second xsl:template match, how do I test for the match pattern? For example if the match patter is title, I want to output different value?

  <xsl:template match="secondary-content">
    <div class="secondary">
      <xsl:apply-templates select="title" />
      <xsl:apply-templates select="block/content | content" />
    </div>
  </xsl:template>
  <xsl:template match="title|content|block/content">
    <xsl:copy-of select="node()" />
  </xsl:template>
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Good question, +1. See my answer for a solution that is simple, short and that doesn't contain any explicit logical XSLT instructions. –  Dimitre Novatchev Aug 23 '11 at 13:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Good question, +1.

In the second template, use this test expression:

test="self::title"

or

test="local-name() = 'title'"

For example, you can use

<xsl:choose>
  <xsl:when test="self::title">
    <someThing>foo</someThing>
  </xsl:when>
  <xsl:otherwise>
    <xsl:copy-of select="node()" />
  </xsl:otherwise>
</xsl:choose>
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Thanks, that works great. –  steve Aug 22 '11 at 19:37
    
@steve: good. BTW you can "accept" this answer if you're satisfied. –  LarsH Aug 23 '11 at 15:28

Why not split it into two separate template rules? It seems strange to have a single template rule to handle several cases when the logic is different for the different cases. Use separate rules, and if the logic is complex, factor common/shared logic into a named template (or if you're feeling ambitious, use xsl:next-match or xsl:apply-imports for the common logic).

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It is almost always better not to have conditional logic within a template body.

Therefore, instead of:

<xsl:template match="title|content|block/content">
  <xsl:choose>
    <!-- conditional processing here -->
  </xsl:choose>
</xsl:template>

write:

<xsl:template match="title">
    <!-- Some processing here -->
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="content|block/content">
    <!-- Some other processing here -->
</xsl:template>

BTW, matching content|block/content is equivalent to the shorter content.

Therefore, the last template can be further simplified to:

<xsl:template match="content">
    <!-- Some other processing here -->
</xsl:template>
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1  
Valid point. But it would help to know why (and therefore when) it is better to use matching rules than to use choose/if. I assumed the OP had combined the templates into one on purpose, e.g. because much of the processing was the same, with a relatively small conditional part. But maybe that is not the case. –  LarsH Aug 23 '11 at 15:29

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