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I'm trying to speed up/vectorize some calculations in a time series. Can I vectorize a calculation in a for loop which can depend on results from an earlier iteration? For example:

z <- c(1,1,0,0,0,0)
zi <- 2:6
for  (i in zi) {z[i] <- ifelse (z[i-1]== 1, 1, 0) }

uses the z[i] values updated in earlier steps:

> z
[1] 1 1 1 1 1 1

In my effort at vectorizing this

z <- c(1,1,0,0,0,0)
z[zi] <- ifelse( z[zi-1] == 1, 1, 0)

the element-by-element operations don't use results updated in the operation:

> z
[1] 1 1 1 0 0 0

So this vectorized operation operates in 'parallel' rather than iterative fashion. Is there a way I can write/vectorize this to get the results of the for loop?

share|improve this question
    
I won't say it's impossible (though I think it is: it's not really vanilla vectorization)... However, I think there may be an elegant solution involving promises and lazy evaluation. –  Iterator Aug 22 '11 at 21:09
    
Yes, it may be impossible, but my vectorized version was a desirable 50 times faster--just not correct in the cases where z[i] depended completely on z[i-1]. Re. not vanilla, yes I was disappointed that my first attempt to vectorize something had the indexes written in a way z[zi-1] that didn't look like what I've usually seen. ;-) But there are some great answers below that I must think thru & apply to my problem & see if they work for me. As a first-timer, I appreciate all the great feedback! –  BobH Aug 22 '11 at 23:07
    
It's a very stimulating problem. I was hoping someone would produce a waterfall of promise expressions. :) Still, the main goal is to speed things up & these guys are clever about that. –  Iterator Aug 22 '11 at 23:25

6 Answers 6

up vote 17 down vote accepted

ifelse is vectorized and there's a bit of a penalty if you're using it on one element at a time in a for-loop. In your example, you can get a pretty good speedup by using if instead of ifelse.

fun1 <- function(z) {
  for(i in 2:NROW(z)) {
    z[i] <- ifelse(z[i-1]==1, 1, 0)
  }
  z
}

fun2 <- function(z) {
  for(i in 2:NROW(z)) {
    z[i] <- if(z[i-1]==1) 1 else 0
  }
  z
}

z <- c(1,1,0,0,0,0)
identical(fun1(z),fun2(z))
# [1] TRUE
system.time(replicate(10000, fun1(z)))
#   user  system elapsed 
#   1.13    0.00    1.32
system.time(replicate(10000, fun2(z)))
#   user  system elapsed 
#   0.27    0.00    0.26 

You can get some additional speed gains out of fun2 by compiling it.

library(compiler)
cfun2 <- cmpfun(fun2)
system.time(replicate(10000, cfun2(z)))
#   user  system elapsed 
#   0.11    0.00    0.11

So there's a 10x speedup without vectorization. As others have said (and some have illustrated) there are ways to vectorize your example, but that may not translate to your actual problem. Hopefully this is general enough to be applicable.

The filter function may be useful to you as well if you can figure out how to express your problem in terms of a autoregressive or moving average process.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 I think this is definitely the best (most general) answer so far ... –  Ben Bolker Aug 22 '11 at 21:36
    
+1 Seconded.... –  Andrie Aug 22 '11 at 21:51
    
10x is not bad! I was getting 50x but incorrect results where z[i] depended on a prior calculation ;-) So I've learned several new things from your answer and your fun2 approach will easily accommodate all the calculations I need to use! Thanks much for the help. –  BobH Aug 22 '11 at 23:24
1  
I am waiting for someone to try Rcpp on this. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Aug 23 '11 at 2:10
    
@Dirk: Bueller? –  Joshua Ulrich Aug 23 '11 at 4:22

This is a nice and simple example where Rcpp can shine.

So let us first recast functions 1 and 2 and their compiled counterparts:

library(inline)
library(rbenchmark)
library(compiler)

fun1 <- function(z) {
  for(i in 2:NROW(z)) {
    z[i] <- ifelse(z[i-1]==1, 1, 0)
  }
  z
}
fun1c <- cmpfun(fun1)


fun2 <- function(z) {
  for(i in 2:NROW(z)) {
    z[i] <- if(z[i-1]==1) 1 else 0
  }
  z
}
fun2c <- cmpfun(fun2)

We write a Rcpp variant very easily:

funRcpp <- cxxfunction(signature(zs="numeric"), plugin="Rcpp", body="
  Rcpp::NumericVector z = Rcpp::NumericVector(zs);
  int n = z.size();
  for (int i=1; i<n; i++) {
    z[i] = (z[i-1]==1.0 ? 1.0 : 0.0);
  }
  return(z);
")

This uses the inline package to compile, load and link the five-liner on the fly.

Now we can define our test-date, which we make a little longer than the original (as just running the original too few times result in unmeasurable times):

R> z <- rep(c(1,1,0,0,0,0), 100)
R> identical(fun1(z),fun2(z),fun1c(z),fun2c(z),funRcpp(z))
[1] TRUE
R> 

All answers are seen as identical.

Finally, we can benchmark:

R> res <- benchmark(fun1(z), fun2(z),
+                  fun1c(z), fun2c(z),
+                  funRcpp(z),
+                  columns=c("test", "replications", "elapsed", 
+                            "relative", "user.self", "sys.self"),
+                  order="relative",
+                  replications=1000)
R> print(res)
        test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self
5 funRcpp(z)         1000   0.005      1.0      0.01        0
4   fun2c(z)         1000   0.466     93.2      0.46        0
2    fun2(z)         1000   1.918    383.6      1.92        0
3   fun1c(z)         1000  10.865   2173.0     10.86        0
1    fun1(z)         1000  12.480   2496.0     12.47        0

The compiled version wins by a factor of almost 400 against the best R version, and almost 100 against its byte-compiled variant. For function 1, the byte compilation matters much less and both variants trail the C++ by a factor of well over two-thousand.

It took about one minute to write the C++ version. The speed gain suggests it was a minute well spent.

For comparison, here is the result for the original short vector called more often:

R> z <- c(1,1,0,0,0,0)
R> res2 <- benchmark(fun1(z), fun2(z),
+                  fun1c(z), fun2c(z),
+                  funRcpp(z),
+                  columns=c("test", "replications", 
+                            "elapsed", "relative", "user.self", "sys.self"),
+                  order="relative",
+                  replications=10000)
R> print(res2)
        test replications elapsed  relative user.self sys.self
5 funRcpp(z)        10000   0.046  1.000000      0.04        0
4   fun2c(z)        10000   0.132  2.869565      0.13        0
2    fun2(z)        10000   0.271  5.891304      0.27        0
3   fun1c(z)        10000   1.045 22.717391      1.05        0
1    fun1(z)        10000   1.202 26.130435      1.20        0

The qualitative ranking is unchanged: the Rcpp version dominates, function2 is second-best. with the byte-compiled version being about twice as fast that the plain R variant, but still almost three times slower than the C++ version. And the relative difference are lower: relatively speaking, the function call overhead matters less and the actual looping matters more: C++ gets a bigger advantage on the actual loop operations in the longer vectors. That it is an important result as it suggests that more real-life sized data, the compiled version may reap a larger benefit.

Edited to correct two small oversights in the code examples. And edited again with thanks to Josh to catch a setup error relative to fun2c.

share|improve this answer
    
fun2 shouldn't be faster than fun2c. Did you accidentally switch the function names? –  Joshua Ulrich Aug 23 '11 at 15:03
    
Yes, thanks. I had the assignment of fun2c and edited it but had not re-run the compilation into fun2c. Now it should be good. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Aug 23 '11 at 15:22
    
Have to try Rcpp version in my bigger problem. It is an impressive illustration of Rccp. I understand why the R "parallel" version of vectorized operations is standard, but the "look back" version seems pretty useful to me. Perhaps it just makes more sense where the index is time and would be arbitrary (e.g. result is path dependent) in other uses of R. –  BobH Aug 23 '11 at 15:50

I think this is cheating and not generalizable, but: according to the rules you have above, any occurrence of 1 in the vector will make all subsequent elements 1 (by recursion: z[i] is 1 set to 1 if z[i-1] equals 1; therefore z[i] will be set to 1 if z[i-2] equals 1; and so forth). Depending on what you really want to do, there may be such a recursive solution available if you think carefully about it ...

z <- c(1,1,0,0,0,0)
first1 <- min(which(z==1))
z[seq_along(z)>first1] <- 1

edit: this is wrong, but I'm leaving it up to admit my mistakes. Based on a little bit of playing (and less thinking), I think the actual solution to this recursion is more symmetric and even simpler:

rep(z[1],length(z))

Test cases:

z <- c(1,1,0,0,0,0)
z <- c(0,1,1,0,0,0)
z <- c(0,0,1,0,0,0)
share|improve this answer
1  
Probably not generalizable but thanks. Parsed my example way down to see exactly what failed. In general my z values rotate among a half dozen states based on a variety of factors. Only rarely is z[i] completely determined by z[i-1] being 1. However, those were the cases where my calculation was failing. So in my case I learned that the vectorized "microcode" so to speak, takes a snapshot of the initial z vector and then uses those frozen values to compute from there on. That's this noob's first time to ever vectorize something, so I had to learn how it actually works. But looping is so slow. –  BobH Aug 22 '11 at 22:57
    
Just one more thought: perhaps you can recast this a successive matrix multiplication problem? –  Ben Bolker Aug 23 '11 at 17:13

Check out the rollapply function in zoo.

I'm not super familiar with it, but I think this does what you want:

> c( 1, rollapply(z,2,function(x) x[1]) )
[1] 1 1 1 1 1 1

I'm sort of kludging it by using a window of 2 and then only using the first element of that window.

For more complicated examples you could perform some calculation on x[1] and return that instead.

share|improve this answer

Sometimes you just need to think about it totally differently. What you're doing is creating a vector where every item is the same as the first if it's a 1 or 0 otherwise.

z <- c(1,1,0,0,0,0)
if (z[1] != 1) z[1] <- 0
z[2:length(z)] <- z[1]
share|improve this answer
    
I thought so too initially, but I think I was wrong (and by extension I think you're wrong). See what happens to {0 1 0}; element 2 gets set to zero by the rule, so you end up with {0 0 0} rather than {0 1 1}. See my answer ... –  Ben Bolker Aug 23 '11 at 17:08
    
no, it doesn't... try my code with 0,1,0 and you'll see that it works... where mine does something different is if z contains anything other than 1s and 0s. But that's easy to fix, add another line where you set everything that's not 1 to 0 and it will work exactly like the code examples in the other answers... only much much faster –  John Aug 23 '11 at 18:05
    
If the questioner wants the extra line I'll add it. As it is, this satisfies the example. –  John Aug 23 '11 at 18:07
    
Hmmm. When I run the OP's code with z <- c(0,1,0); zi <-2:3 I get {0 0 0}, when I run your code I get {0 1 1}. One of us is confused (it could be me). –  Ben Bolker Aug 23 '11 at 19:03
    
Clearly it was me because when I looked at the OP's code I thought it gave 0 1 1 and I was misreading what you said.... ummm... yes, you're clearly right, it just sets all the values to the first value if it's a one or 0 otherwise... see my new answer. –  John Aug 23 '11 at 19:15

It's also possible to do this with "apply" using the original vector and a lagged version of the vector as the constituent columns of a data frame.

share|improve this answer
    
What data frame? Can you demonstrate with code? I'd also be surprised if what you come up with is meaningfully faster than a for loop. –  GSee Oct 10 '14 at 23:07

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