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so I'm currently trying to migrate my Java experience to C++ by implementing various Data Structures for the sake of having them implemented at least once.

Would you mind giving me some advise? The problem I am having is mainly concentrated around the pointers in push(int value) and especially pop(). As push seems to be working correctly I found myself struggling to get the correct value back when pop'ing things. What's the matter?

PS: I also think, that since I allocate my array space manually I'd need to delete it aswell. How do I do that?

#ifndef STACK_H
#define STACK_H

class Stack
{
private:
    int *stackArray;
    int elementsInArray;
    int allocatedArraySize;
    int alpha;
    int beta;

public:
    Stack();
    void push(int aValue);
    int pop();
    bool isEmpty();
    int size() const;
};

#endif

and the implementation:

#include <iostream>
#include "Stack.h"

Stack::Stack() 
{
    alpha = 4;
    beta = 2;
    elementsInArray = 0;
    allocatedArraySize = 1;
    stackArray = new int[1];
}

void Stack::push(int aValue)
{
    if (elementsInArray == allocatedArraySize) 
    {
        int temporaryArray[allocatedArraySize*beta];

        for (int i = 0; i < elementsInArray; i++)
            temporaryArray[i] = stackArray[i];

        stackArray = temporaryArray;
        allocatedArraySize *= beta;
    }

    elementsInArray++;
    stackArray[elementsInArray] = aValue;
}

int Stack::pop()
{
    int result = -INT_MAX;

    if (elementsInArray == 0)
        return result;

    if (elementsInArray > 0) 
    {
        result = stackArray[elementsInArray-1];
        elementsInArray--;

        if (elementsInArray <= allocatedArraySize/alpha) 
        {
            int temporaryArray[allocatedArraySize/alpha];

            for (int i = 0; i < elementsInArray; i++) 
                temporaryArray[i] = stackArray[i];

            stackArray = temporaryArray;
            allocatedArraySize /= beta;
        }
    }

    return result;
}

bool Stack::isEmpty()
{
    if (elementsInArray == 0) 
        return true;

    return false;
}

int Stack::size() const
{
    return allocatedArraySize;
}
share|improve this question
    
Looks more like C than C++. –  Ed S. Aug 22 '11 at 21:15
4  
Sorry, but you are doing it all wrong, and neither push nor pop are working correctly. The biggest problem is that you don't understand memory allocation in C++ (which is a bit strange because if you had done it in a Java like way you would have been closer). You cannot do this int temporaryArray[allocatedArraySize*beta]; ... stackArray = temporaryArray;. It will compile but it surely won't work. Memory allocation is far too big a topic to cover in a forum like this. You need urgently to read a book on C++. –  john Aug 22 '11 at 21:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

For starters, you should be post incrementing the index on the array, so change:

elementsInArray++;
stackArray[elementsInArray] = aValue;

to:

stackArray[elementsInArray++] = aValue;

or:

stackArray[elementsInArray] = aValue;
elementsInArray++;

Second, when you create the new temp array you are doing it inside the if statement... therefore it is a local variable and placed on the system stack and lost after you exit the if statement. So change

int temporaryArray[allocatedArraySize*beta];

to:

int *temporaryArray = new int[allocatedArraySize*beta];

Third, add in the delete you were talking about by saving the original pointer from stackArray before copying the location of tempArray and then perform the delete after you've made the pointer copy.

Finally, you'll have to make similar changes to your pop function...

share|improve this answer
1  
And the OP also needs to add a destructor, copy constructor and assignment operator to the Stack class. Only then will they have working code. –  john Aug 22 '11 at 21:24
    
Thank you very much Gregg, much appreciated! You and ex0du5 helped me out a lot. And john, I know I have a lot to learn when it comes to cpp but I'm not a virgin in programming and in the time that you declared my attempts basically hopeless in three separate comments, three others managed to help me a lot more. Thank you nonetheless. –  wasabii Aug 22 '11 at 21:33
1  
I think I've been dubbed into solving your code kata for you! ;) Next time I'm only giving hints! –  Gregg Rivinius Aug 22 '11 at 21:39
1  
@wasabii: even if you don't like how John said things, pay attention to what he said. The functions he mentioned are called the "rule of three" that your class violates, and will cause major problems if you don't fix it. –  Mooing Duck Aug 22 '11 at 22:01
    
+1 @ Mooin Duck. - On a sidenote: I definitely did pay attention and I'm already reading up on them :-) That's why I thanked him nonetheless. –  wasabii Aug 22 '11 at 22:04

You are using an array on the stack (not your stack - the program execution stack). It's the one called temporaryArray in your push function. The address of that array will be invalid when you return from that function (because other functions will use the stack to hold other data).

what you want to do is allocate that array on the heap. This is memory that stays around for your program as long as you need it. To do this, you would allocate your temporaryArray like

int * temporaryArray(new int[allocatedArraySize*beta]);

Then, after copying the elements from your old array, you would delete it by using:

delete [] stackArray;

Do this before assigning the stackArray with the temporaryArray.

There may be other issues with your data structure, but you are doing the basic indexing correctly and incrementing / decrementing the current index appropriately (though I would suggest preferring to use the preincrement / decrement forms when not using the temporary as a good habit to get in - ie. ++elementsInArray / --elementsInArray).

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much :) Helped me out a lot aswell. –  wasabii Aug 22 '11 at 21:35

well, i'm sure you already know that you have stack as a generic (c++ call it templates) in the STD library. Assuming you are doing this as a code kata, i would start writing it as a template, so it can't take object types others than integers.

Also, if you are going to write more of these low-level structures (as part of your kata), write a thin class where you delegate all allocation, reallocation and allocated size tracking, and use that instead of using arrays directly.

share|improve this answer
    
Really this answer just misses the point. The posted code has serious errors. –  john Aug 22 '11 at 21:22
    
A "Code-Kata" is precisely what I'm trying to do. Nicely phrased :-) –  wasabii Aug 22 '11 at 21:22
    
Will be working on that piece of code for some more time and try to follow your advice when migrating in to a template later on. –  wasabii Aug 22 '11 at 21:36

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