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I am creating an application to have administrators enter the a localized static content of a page. For ex. nowadays the "About Us" content is English, I would like an admin to be able to enter the same "About Us" content in Russian. How should I store the localized content? I'm thinking that the admin won't be able to edit the YAML files for each language. i thought storing all the data in a table and have a reference language id to it stored in a cookie. Having a call to the locale cookie each time a view loads checking out which language I am using, comparing it to the database and then calling the specific row where language = en/ru/whatever.

anybody could think of a better way?

thanks in advance!

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Perhaps store the language id in the session? – Odin Aug 22 '11 at 23:41
up vote 1 down vote accepted

odin is right, I do mean storing multiple versions of pages in different languages, I thought I could just leave it in YAML and in-place edit it and I stumbled across this -

http://asciicasts.com/episodes/256-i18n-backends

We change the i18n backend to Key-Value backend (Hash) but then it would mean that each restart of the webserver the hash will be lost and thus the article suggests using Redis another key-value storage which calls itself

Redis is an open source, advanced key-value store. It is often referred to as a data structure server since keys can contain strings, hashes, lists, sets and sorted sets.

It seems fairly clever saving it like this, because I still use the Rails l18n, meaning I can route everything fairly easily, but I am enabling the user to edit the content for each locale.

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Nowadays, you can simply put index.fr.html.erb and index.en.html.erb in the same folder and rails will do the rest.

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thanks for this little catch-up – JustBasti Apr 26 '14 at 19:08
    
awesome solution, i love rails – damian004 Oct 3 '14 at 9:36

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