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I am using php 5.3.6.

When I create a new object, the following works:

$my_object = new my_clas();

But what if I wanted to pass values, such as this:

$my_object = new my_clas( $value1 , @value2 );

Where would those values go? Do they go to the __construct function or can I target a specific function?

Note: Right now I have a class with a __construct function and I am doing the above (e.g., passing values) and everything works fine, but I am wondering if this is just a happy accident or something I should worry about.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The will be passed to the __construct function, always. If you want to pass them to another function from there, then call it inside __construct

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I know this is quasi unrelated, but . . . is there a way for the __construct to know the name of the object being instantiated? –  HumanBacon Aug 22 '11 at 22:15
    
@HumanBacon if you mean the name of the whole class like my_clas in your example then you can use __CLASS__. You can't get the name of the object itself from within the constructor –  Paulpro Aug 22 '11 at 22:19

If you do:

$my_object = new my_clas( $value1 , @value2 );

The params will be passed to the constructor.

If you want to pass it to other function in the class you can do:

$my_object = new my_clas();
$my_object->myfunction($value1, $value2);

Or let the constructor handle it.

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The @ is not PHP.

class my_clas{
    function __construct($value1,$value2){
        //Here you can play with $value1 and $value2
    }
}
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1  
Sure it is. It suppresses the warning when PHP fails to find a constant named value2 and treats "value2" as a string instead :P –  Paulpro Aug 22 '11 at 22:20
1  
Actually, in this case, the @ was a typo on my part. My bad. –  HumanBacon Aug 22 '11 at 22:30

another idea could be is you pass the values into the page as your code would suggest

$myClassTest = new ClassTest($value1, $value2)
$myData = $myClassTest->getValue2();

and in the class

class ClassTest
{

    private $value1;
    private $value2;

    __construct($value1, $value2)
    {
         $this->value1 = $value1;
         $this->value2 = $value2;
    }

    function getValue2()
    {
        return $this->value2;
    }

}

this way, you can always call the getValue for the data you require. i normally create this for all variables that i would have in a class. great for testing a class.

also if you want to set a value add

function setValue2($value2)
{
    $this->value2 = $value2;
}
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Yes, when you instantiate a class, the called method is __construct or other with the same name that the class if you aren't using namespaces since PHP 5.3.3

More info about constructors: http://php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.decon.php

And for the deprecated use of methods called with the same name that the class if you are using namespaces: http://php.net/releases/5_3_3.php

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