Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Does anyone know how to do convert from a string to a boolean in Python? I found this link. But it doesn't look like a proper way to do it. I.e. using a built in functionality, etc.

EDIT: The reason I asked this is because I learned int("string"), from here. I tried bool ("string") but always got True.

share|improve this question
4  
What codes do you use for your booleans? "T", "True", "t", "true", "1"? Lots of choices -- which specific values are you looking to translate to boolean True/False? –  S.Lott Apr 3 '09 at 19:48
    
Thanks, I was looking for "True", "False". –  Joan Venge Apr 3 '09 at 20:06

20 Answers 20

up vote 200 down vote accepted

Really, you just compare the string to whatever you expect to accept as representing true, so you can do this:

s == 'True'

Or to checks against a whole bunch of values:

s in ['true', '1', 't', 'y', 'yes', 'yeah', 'yup', 'certainly', 'uh-huh']

Be cautious when using the following:

>>> bool("foo")
True
>>> bool("")
False

Empty strings evaluate to False, but everything else evaluates to True. So this should not be used for any kind of parsing purposes.

share|improve this answer
13  
+1: Not much could be simpler than s == "True". But I've seen people make a real mess of this. def convert(s): if s == "True": return True; return False. –  S.Lott Apr 3 '09 at 20:11
6  
I prefer return s == "True" over the if/else –  Dana Apr 3 '09 at 20:35
9  
if s == "True": return True elif s=="False": return False else: return raise –  Unknown Jul 11 '09 at 21:43
4  
Wait... you didn't just downvote me because I used a list rather than a tuple in a quick example, did you? That's pretty petty if you did. That's about the only remotely stylist problem I can see. –  Keith Gaughan Aug 20 '11 at 8:48
6  
Nice, but should probably have s.lower() in .... –  Thor Oct 23 '13 at 23:06
def str2bool(v):
  return v.lower() in ("yes", "true", "t", "1")

Then call it like so:

str2bool("yes")

> True

str2bool("no")

> False

str2bool("stuff")

> False

str2bool("1")

> True

str2bool("0")

> False


Handling true and false explicitly:

You could also make your function explicitly check against a True list of words and a False list of words. Then if it is in neither list, you could throw an exception.

share|improve this answer
9  
+1 elegant solution –  wzzrd Apr 3 '09 at 20:09

Starting with Python 2.6, there is now ast.literal_eval:

>>> import ast
>>> help(ast.literal_eval)
Help on function literal_eval in module ast:

literal_eval(node_or_string)
    Safely evaluate an expression node or a string containing a Python
    expression.  The string or node provided may only consist of the following
    Python literal structures: strings, numbers, tuples, lists, dicts, booleans,
    and None.

Which seems to work, as long as you're sure your strings are going to be either "True" or "False":

>>> ast.literal_eval("True")
True
>>> ast.literal_eval("False")
False
>>> ast.literal_eval("F")
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "", line 1, in 
  File "/opt/Python-2.6.1/lib/python2.6/ast.py", line 68, in literal_eval
    return _convert(node_or_string)
  File "/opt/Python-2.6.1/lib/python2.6/ast.py", line 67, in _convert
    raise ValueError('malformed string')
ValueError: malformed string
>>> ast.literal_eval("'False'")
'False'

I wouldn't normally recommend this, but it is completely built-in and could be the right thing depending on your requirements.

share|improve this answer
    
Not sure of the general applicability of this solution, but it's very nice, in a general sort of way. +1! –  IfLoop Jul 11 '09 at 21:04
3  
Yeah... this is a handy way to do it. Thanks! –  Paul McMillan Apr 20 '10 at 3:05
    
+1 so far the best option to actually parse any literal without risk of evaluating something harmful. –  Tadeck Oct 23 '12 at 15:39
    
Gaah, that's horrifying! Then again, you did say you don't recommend it, and it does answer the question neatly. Good find! –  Matthew Phipps Dec 17 '13 at 22:19
1  
Unfortunately it doesn't handle this case >>>ast.literal_eval('true') or ast.literal_eval('TRUE') Raises >>> raise ValueError('malformed string') The fix is simple though ast.literal_eval(to_test.title()) –  Bhushan May 8 at 3:13

Just use:

distutils.util.strtobool(some_string)

http://docs.python.org/2/distutils/apiref.html?highlight=distutils.util#distutils.util.strtobool

True values are y, yes, t, true, on and 1; false values are n, no, f, false, off and 0. Raises ValueError if val is anything else.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately this returns 1/0 not True/False, so you need to wrap the result in bool() to get actual boolean: bool(distutils.util.strtobool(some_string)) –  Secator Jun 23 at 9:07

The JSON parser is also useful for in general converting strings to reasonable python types.

>>> import json
>>> json.loads("false")
False
>>> json.loads("true")
True
share|improve this answer
    
Readable, explicit, and short - Thanks –  andyzinsser Apr 4 '13 at 16:41
8  
Note this method only works if it's lowercase. If it's uppercase, you can't. You have to call .lower() –  CppLearner May 8 '13 at 12:19

Here's is my version. It checks against both positive and negative values lists, raising an exception for unknown values. And it does not receive a string, but any type should do.

def to_bool(value):
    """
       Converts 'something' to boolean. Raises exception for invalid formats
           Possible True  values: 1, True, "1", "TRue", "yes", "y", "t"
           Possible False values: 0, False, None, [], {}, "", "0", "faLse", "no", "n", "f", 0.0, ...
    """
    if str(value).lower() in ("yes", "y", "true",  "t", "1"): return True
    if str(value).lower() in ("no",  "n", "false", "f", "0", "0.0", "", "none", "[]", "{}"): return False
    raise Exception('Invalid value for boolean conversion: ' + str(value))

Sample runs:

>>> to_bool(True)
True
>>> to_bool("tRUe")
True
>>> to_bool("1")
True
>>> to_bool(1)
True
>>> to_bool(2)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 9, in to_bool
Exception: Invalid value for boolean conversion: 2
>>> to_bool([])
False
>>> to_bool({})
False
>>> to_bool(None)
False
>>> to_bool("Wasssaaaaa")
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 9, in to_bool
Exception: Invalid value for boolean conversion: Wasssaaaaa
>>>
share|improve this answer
    
One could get bitten by this: to_bool(["hello"]) which should be a perfectly valid call, if [] is supported –  Rafael T Mar 4 '13 at 0:06
    
Returns "Exception: Invalid value for boolean conversion: ['hello']", which is expected and documented. In my opinion an empty list was clearly a false, but ['false'] wasn't clearly anything, so I left it out intentionally - that's a feature not a bug. Should be easy to add support for returning true for non-empty lists if that's what you want. –  Petrucio Mar 5 '13 at 7:39
1  
shure you documented it. But in real live one would never call to_bool([]). Instead he would do something along these lines: myList=someFunctionThatReturnAList `if (is_bool(myList)):...´ so one have a list and want to know if this list is None or empty. –  Rafael T Mar 5 '13 at 16:12
    
Why not try this: >>> def a2b(arg): ... default = bool(arg) ... if isinstance(arg, str): ... return arg.lower() in ['true', 't', 'yes', 'y', '1'] ... else: ... return default –  ThePracticalOne Jun 12 '13 at 19:12

This version keeps the semantics of constructors like int(value) and provides an easy way to define acceptable string values.

def to_bool(value):
    valid = {'true': True, 't': True, '1': True,
             'false': False, 'f': False, '0': False,
             }   

    if isinstance(value, bool):
        return value

    if not isinstance(value, basestring):
        raise ValueError('invalid literal for boolean. Not a string.')

    lower_value = value.lower()
    if lower_value in valid:
        return valid[lower_value]
    else:
        raise ValueError('invalid literal for boolean: "%s"' % value)


# Test cases
assert to_bool('true'), '"true" is True' 
assert to_bool('True'), '"True" is True' 
assert to_bool('TRue'), '"TRue" is True' 
assert to_bool('TRUE'), '"TRUE" is True' 
assert to_bool('T'), '"T" is True' 
assert to_bool('t'), '"t" is True' 
assert to_bool('1'), '"1" is True' 
assert to_bool(True), 'True is True' 
assert to_bool(u'true'), 'unicode "true" is True'

assert to_bool('false') is False, '"false" is False' 
assert to_bool('False') is False, '"False" is False' 
assert to_bool('FAlse') is False, '"FAlse" is False' 
assert to_bool('FALSE') is False, '"FALSE" is False' 
assert to_bool('F') is False, '"F" is False' 
assert to_bool('f') is False, '"f" is False' 
assert to_bool('0') is False, '"0" is False' 
assert to_bool(False) is False, 'False is False'
assert to_bool(u'false') is False, 'unicode "false" is False'

# Expect ValueError to be raised for invalid parameter...
try:
    to_bool('')
    to_bool(12)
    to_bool([])
    to_bool('yes')
    to_bool('FOObar')
except ValueError, e:
    pass
share|improve this answer
    
you should add: isinstance(value,bool):return value –  Nicholas Hamilton Apr 12 at 2:51
    
and change isinstance(value,str) to isinstance(value,basestring) –  Nicholas Hamilton Apr 12 at 2:52
    
Thanks Nicholas, good suggestions. Code has been updated. –  Michael Richmond Sep 11 at 17:39

You probably already have a solution but for others who are looking for a method to convert a value to a boolean value using "standard" false values including None, [], {}, and "" in addition to false, no , and 0.

def toBoolean( val ):
    """ 
    Get the boolean value of the provided input.

        If the value is a boolean return the value.
        Otherwise check to see if the value is in 
        ["false", "f", "no", "n", "none", "0", "[]", "{}", "" ]
        and returns True if value is not in the list
    """

    if val is True or val is False:
        return val

    falseItems = ["false", "f", "no", "n", "none", "0", "[]", "{}", "" ]

    return not str( val ).strip().lower() in falseItems
share|improve this answer
    
it's better to use sets, not in and your selection of false items is somewhat idiosyncratic. –  SilentGhost Jan 15 '10 at 18:31

you could always do something like

myString = "false"
val = (myString == "true")

the bit in parens would evaluate to False. This is just another way to do it without having to do an actual function call.

share|improve this answer
    
What is the val = "false" line doing on this example? Why is it there? What does it mean? –  S.Lott Apr 3 '09 at 20:13
4  
I think it means 42. –  Tempus Apr 3 '09 at 20:47
    
@Geo: I agree; but what was the question that is answered by that statement? –  S.Lott Apr 3 '09 at 23:11
    
it was meant to be myString –  helloandre Apr 4 '09 at 6:16

This is the version I wrote. Combines several of the other solutions into one.

def to_bool(value):
    """
    Converts 'something' to boolean. Raises exception if it gets a string it doesn't handle.
    Case is ignored for strings. These string values are handled:
      True: 'True', "1", "TRue", "yes", "y", "t"
      False: "", "0", "faLse", "no", "n", "f"
    Non-string values are passed to bool.
    """
    if type(value) == type(''):
        if value.lower() in ("yes", "y", "true",  "t", "1"):
            return True
        if value.lower() in ("no",  "n", "false", "f", "0", ""):
            return False
        raise Exception('Invalid value for boolean conversion: ' + value)
    return bool(value)

If it gets a string it expects specific values, otherwise raises an Exception. If it doesn't get a string, just lets the bool constructor figure it out. Tested these cases:

test_cases = [
    ('true', True),
    ('t', True),
    ('yes', True),
    ('y', True),
    ('1', True),
    ('false', False),
    ('f', False),
    ('no', False),
    ('n', False),
    ('0', False),
    ('', False),
    (1, True),
    (0, False),
    (1.0, True),
    (0.0, False),
    ([], False),
    ({}, False),
    ((), False),
    ([1], True),
    ({1:2}, True),
    ((1,), True),
    (None, False),
    (object(), True),
    ]
share|improve this answer

I don't agree with any solution here, as they are too permissive. This is not normally what you want when parsing a string.

So here the solution I'm using:

def to_bool(bool_str):
    """Parse the string and return the boolean value encoded or raise an exception"""
    if isinstance(bool_str, basestring) and bool_str: 
        if bool_str.lower() in ['true', 't', '1']: return True
        elif bool_str.lower() in ['false', 'f', '0']: return False

    #if here we couldn't parse it
    raise ValueError("%s is no recognized as a boolean value" % bool_str)

And the results:

>>> [to_bool(v) for v in ['true','t','1','F','FALSE','0']]
[True, True, True, False, False, False]
>>> to_bool("")
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 8, in to_bool
ValueError: '' is no recognized as a boolean value

Just to be clear because it looks as if my answer offended somebody somehow:

The point is that you don't want to test for only one value and assume the other. I don't think you always want to map Absolutely everything to the non parsed value. That produces error prone code.

So, if you know what you want code it in.

share|improve this answer
2  
I think you're missing the point: the point of the answers was to demonstrate the general principle, not to tell person who asked the question exactly how they should do it. The person who asked the question originally was overthinking what's actually a simple problem. –  Keith Gaughan Nov 26 '12 at 10:37
2  
@Keith I disagree. The point is answering the question as it is asked. –  estani Nov 26 '12 at 10:45
1  
The question asked was how to convert a string to a boolean. That was the question I answered. I have no idea what's considered a valid boolean string for the original poster, and nor do you. That's why it's more important to demonstrate the general principle than give the poster the full answer. The original poster didn't need everything spelled out to them: all they needed was for the general principle to be demonstrated. From that, anybody competent will get to your answer. –  Keith Gaughan Nov 26 '12 at 10:53
    
@Keith not sure what this is all about but the point is building knowledge. I'm not "judging" your answer, I fell no other answer was "complete" as they missed the fact that parsing a boolean has 3 outcomes, true, false or unparsable. That's all. (I will just pretend I never read the last line of your comment) –  estani Nov 28 '12 at 16:38

The usual rule for casting to a bool is that a few special literals (False, 0, 0.0, (), [], {}) are false and then everything else is true, so I recommend the following:

def boolify(val):
    if (isinstance(val, basestring) and bool(val)):
        return not val in ('False', '0', '0.0')
    else:
        return bool(val)
share|improve this answer
4  
Your if statement can be simplified to if isinstance(val, basestring): –  dbr Jul 11 '09 at 22:22
    
Updated to simplify the check for a string. Thanks! –  Carl G May 21 '13 at 17:11

A dict (really, a defaultdict) gives you a pretty easy way to do this trick:

from collections import defaultdict
bool_mapping = defaultdict(bool) # Will give you False for non-found values
for val in ['True', 'yes', ...]:
    bool_mapping[val] = True

print(bool_mapping['True']) # True
print(bool_mapping['kitten']) # False

It's really easy to tailor this method to the exact conversion behavior you want -- you can fill it with allowed Truthy and Falsy values and let it raise an exception (or return None) when a value isn't found, or default to True, or default to False, or whatever you want.

share|improve this answer

A cool, simple trick (based on what @Alan Marchiori posted), but using yaml:

import yaml

parsed = yaml.load("true")
print bool(parsed)

If this is too wide, it can be refined by testing the type result. If the yaml-returned type is a str, then it can't be cast to any other type (that I can think of anyway), so you could handle that separately, or just let it be true.

I won't make any guesses at speed, but since I am working with yaml data under Qt gui anyway, this has a nice symmetry.

share|improve this answer

You can simply use the built-in function eval():

a='True'
if a is True:
    print 'a is True, a type is', type(a)
else:
    print "a isn't True, a type is", type(a)
b = eval(a)
if b is True:
    print 'b is True, b type is', type(b)
else:
    print "b isn't True, b type is", type(b)

and the output:

a isn't True, a type is <type 'str'>
b is True, b type is <type 'bool'>
share|improve this answer

here's a hairy, built in way to get many of the same answers. Note that although python considers "" to be false and all other strings to be true, TCL has a very different idea about things.

>>> import Tkinter
>>> tk = Tkinter.Tk()
>>> var = Tkinter.BooleanVar(tk)
>>> var.set("false")
>>> var.get()
False
>>> var.set("1")
>>> var.get()
True
>>> var.set("[exec 'rm -r /']")
>>> var.get()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "/usr/lib/python2.5/lib-tk/Tkinter.py", line 324, in get
    return self._tk.getboolean(self._tk.globalgetvar(self._name))
_tkinter.TclError: 0expected boolean value but got "[exec 'rm -r /']"
>>>

A good thing about this is that it is fairly forgiving about the values you can use. It's lazy about turning strings into values, and it's hygenic about what it accepts and rejects(notice that if the above statement were given at a tcl prompt, it would erase the users hard disk).

the bad thing is that it requires that Tkinter be available, which is usually, but not universally true, and more significantly, requires that a Tk instance be created, which is comparatively heavy.

What is considered true or false depends on the behavior of the Tcl_GetBoolean, which considers 0, false, no and off to be false and 1, true, yes and on to be true, case insensitive. Any other string, including the empty string, cause an exception.

share|improve this answer
def str2bool(str):
  if isinstance(str, basestring) and str.lower() in ['0','false','no']:
    return False
  else:
    return bool(str)

idea: check if you want the string to be evaluated to False; otherwise bool() returns True for any non-empty string.

share|improve this answer

Here's something I threw together to evaluate the truthiness of a string:

def as_bool(val):
 if val:
  try:
   if not int(val): val=False
  except: pass
  try:
   if val.lower()=="false": val=False
  except: pass
 return bool(val)

more-or-less same results as using eval but safer.

share|improve this answer

I like to use the ternary operator for this, since it's a bit more succinct for something that feels like it shouldn't be more than 1 line.

True if myString=="True" else False
share|improve this answer

I realize this is an old post, but some of the solutions require quite a bit of code, here's what I ended up using:

def str2bool(value):
    return {"True": True, "true": True}.get(value, False)
share|improve this answer
1  
That's functionally equivalent to, and more complex than: return value in ('True', 'true') –  Keith Gaughan Aug 28 '13 at 10:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.