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Interface IWorkPerson
{
    public string FirstName {get; set;}
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public string WorkPhone { get; set; }
}

interface IHomePerson
{
    public string FirstName {get; set;}
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public string HomePhone { get; set; }
}

public class Person : IWorkPerson, IHomePerson
{
    public string FirstName {get; set;}
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public string WorkPhone { get; set; }
    public string HomePhone { get; set; }
}

How can I make the Person class implement IWorkPerson and IHomePerson in C#?

The compiler complains about ambiguous references.

share|improve this question
2  
This code cannot compile, public is not valid in an interface declaration. This is otherwise well defined, no "ambiguous references". Post code that actually produces the error. – Hans Passant Aug 22 '11 at 22:55
    
Please provide code that compiles (i.e. remove public from interface properties) and reporoduces error - there is nothing wrong to have the same method/property to be part of multiple interfaces... – Alexei Levenkov Aug 22 '11 at 22:56
    
works in VS2010 (after removing 'public' from interface properties) – devio Aug 22 '11 at 22:59
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Compiles fine w/VS2010 under .Net 2.0, 3.0, 3.5 or 4.0 once you strip out the 'public' modifiers from your interface declarations. What version of Visual Studio are you using (or are you using Mono?) and what version of the .Net framework are you targeting?

This code compiles absolutely clean:

public interface IWorkPerson
{
    string FirstName { get; set; }
    string LastName  { get; set; }
    string WorkPhone { get; set; }
}
public interface IHomePerson
{
    string FirstName { get; set; }
    string LastName  { get; set; }
    string HomePhone { get; set; }
}
public class Person : IWorkPerson , IHomePerson
{
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName  { get; set; }
    public string WorkPhone { get; set; }
    public string HomePhone { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer

Look at explicit implementation of intefaces.

From the referenced link:

// explicit1.cs
interface IDimensions 
{
   float Length();
   float Width();
}

class Box : IDimensions 
{
   float lengthInches;
   float widthInches;

   public Box(float length, float width) 
   {
      lengthInches = length;
      widthInches = width;
   }
   // Explicit interface member implementation: 
   float IDimensions.Length() 
   {
      return lengthInches;
   }
   // Explicit interface member implementation:
   float IDimensions.Width() 
   {
      return widthInches;      
   }

   public static void Main() 
   {
      // Declare a class instance "myBox":
      Box myBox = new Box(30.0f, 20.0f);
      // Declare an interface instance "myDimensions":
      IDimensions myDimensions = (IDimensions) myBox;
      // Print out the dimensions of the box:
      /* The following commented lines would produce compilation 
         errors because they try to access an explicitly implemented
         interface member from a class instance:                   */
      //System.Console.WriteLine("Length: {0}", myBox.Length());
      //System.Console.WriteLine("Width: {0}", myBox.Width());
      /* Print out the dimensions of the box by calling the methods 
         from an instance of the interface:                         */
      System.Console.WriteLine("Length: {0}", myDimensions.Length());
      System.Console.WriteLine("Width: {0}", myDimensions.Width());
   }
}
share|improve this answer

You have to declare explicit implementations:

public class Person : IWorkPerson, IHomePerson
{
    public string IWorkPerson.FirstName {get; set;}
    public string IWorkPerson.LastName { get; set; }
    public string IHomePerson.FirstName {get; set;}
    public string IHomePerson.LastName { get; set; }
    public string WorkPhone { get; set; }
    public string HomePhone { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
class Person : IWorkPerson, IHomePerson 
{
    public string IWorkPerson.FirstName {get; set; }
    public string IHomePerson.FirstName {get; set; }
    // etc...
 }

This is called explicit implementation and it's how you disambiguate identical interface members.

share|improve this answer

Provide implementations for IWorkPerson.Foo and IHomePerson.Foo in your class.

I hope those aren't real interfaces. Both should inherit from a common interface, and I don't understand the abstraction that says that a Person is both a HomePerson and a WorkPerson. Sounds like it should be an enumeration, not an interface.

share|improve this answer
    
It's a totally fabricated example because I have a more complicated inheritance problem at work. – Jim G. Aug 22 '11 at 23:01
    
@Jim G.: Then perhaps you should show us the code that's causing the problem. You example code is perfectly legal. – Nicholas Carey Aug 22 '11 at 23:06

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