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I'm just getting started in OO javascript so please bear with me.

This works:

var myObj = {
     foo : function() {
            alert('hello');
            this.bar();
     },
     bar: function() {
            alert('world');
     }
}

However if I do some other stuff after the hello alert in the "foo" method then the meaning of "this" changes from the object to whatever I last selected so using this.bar() doesn't execute the other method in the class.

So I tried to cache "this" in a variable like so:

var myObj = {
     publicVars: {
            theObj : this
     },
     foo : function() {
            alert('hello');
            publicVars.theObj.bar();
     },
     bar: function() {
            alert('world');
     }
}

But that didn't work either. So what is the solution?

EDIT

Here is my actual code:

var formObj = {

     validate : function(theForm) {
            $('input, textarea', theForm).each(function() {
                 var valueLength = $(this).val().length;
                 if (valueLength === 0) {
                        $(this).addClass('invalid');
                        this.listenForInput($(this)); // <!------- this isn't working
                 }
            });
     },
     listenForInput : function(theField) {
//          theField.keyup(function() {
//               if ($(this).val().length > 0) {
//                      theField.removeClass('invalid');
//               }
//          });
            alert('I work!!!!');
     }

} // end obj
share|improve this question
    
What is that " other stuff " because this shouldn't change inside that object. –  Joe Aug 23 '11 at 0:55
    
What is the "other stuff" you are talking about? If you are creating a callback, then yes this will refer to window (most likely). In this case you just have to create a reference to this inside foo first. –  Felix Kling Aug 23 '11 at 0:55
    
I posted my actual code in the edit. Please take a look. –  Pam Aug 23 '11 at 1:01
    
With regard to your updated code, you seem to want this to refer to your formObj, and the DOM element at the same time. That's just not going to happen. this.listenForInput($(this)); –  user113716 Aug 23 '11 at 1:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

As I said in my comment, you have to keep a reference inside the function:

validate: function(theForm) {
    var self = this;
    $('input, textarea', theForm).each(function() {
        var valueLength = $(this).val().length;
        if (valueLength === 0) {
           $(this).addClass('invalid');
           self.listenForInput($(this));
        }
    });
},

You are passing a function to each. Inside this callback, this refers to the DOM element. That's why you pass it to jQuery ($(this)) to be able to call jQuery methods on that element. It cannot refer to formObj too!


What this refers to is determined by how a function is called and each function has its own this (the Mozilla documention describes this in more detail).

If you call validate with formObj.validate(), then this refers to formObj.

The jQuery documentation for each states:

More importantly, the callback is fired in the context of the current DOM element, so the keyword this refers to the element.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 That'll do the trick. –  user113716 Aug 23 '11 at 1:08

Am I missing something, or can you not just reference the object by name, like this:

var myObj = {
    foo: function() {
        alert('hello');
        myObj.bar();
    },
    bar: function() {
        alert('world');
    }
}

myObj.foo();

http://jsfiddle.net/karim79/kaXYj/

share|improve this answer
    
yup works, didn't know you could reference an object just by it's name. All the tutorials use "this" keyword, the people above said the meaning of "this" should never change. But it did for me, so not sure what's going on there but yes this works, thanks. –  Pam Aug 23 '11 at 1:06
    
Although this is a fix, I would suggest accepting @Felix Kling's answer, which I think is better suited to this situation. I had not fully understood the context of your question at the time of writing as you had not added your actual implementation. –  karim79 Aug 23 '11 at 1:26

A function's this keyword is set by the call, it can't change during function execution.

Calling obj.foo() sets foo's this to obj so calling this.bar calls obj.bar. However, if you call foo some other way, e.g.:

var a = obj.foo;
a();

then its this will may be obj (in the above case it will be window or undefined in strict mode) so you get a different bar or an error if the this object doesn't have a bar property.

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