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I'm trying to open a CSV file, look up a string, and then return the 2nd column of the csv file, but only the the first instance of it. I've gotten as far as the following, but unfortunately, it returns every instance. I'm a bit flummoxed.

Can the gods of Ruby help? Thanks much in advance.

M

for the purpose of this example, let's say names.csv is a file with the following:

foo, happy
foo, sad
bar, tired
foo, hungry
foo, bad


#!/usr/local/bin/ruby -w

require 'rubygems'
require 'fastercsv'
require 'pp'

  FasterCSV.open('newfile.csv', 'w') do |output|
    FasterCSV.foreach('names.csv') do |lookup|
      index_PL = lookup.index('foo')
      if index_PL
        output << lookup[2]
      end
    end
  end

ok, so, if I want to return all instances of foo, but in a csv, then how does that work? so what I'd like as an outcome is happy, sad, hungry, bad. I thought it would be:

  FasterCSV.open('newfile.csv', 'w') do |output|
    FasterCSV.foreach('names.csv') do |lookup|
      index_PL = lookup.index('foo')
      if index_PL
        build_str << "," << lookup[2]
      end
      output << build_str
    end
  end

but it does not seem to work

share|improve this question
    
Have you considered just using grep and cut? e.g. grep 'foo' | cut -d, -f2 –  buruzaemon Aug 23 '11 at 4:48
    
Does 'foo' change or is it static?, can you paste an example snippet of the names.csv –  Barlow Aug 23 '11 at 4:52
    
yes, have considered grep + cut but it's part of a larger program. Also, foo will really be replaced by a changing variable but for the purpose of this, we can presume that it's just the string foo. (thanks ) –  MarkL Aug 23 '11 at 5:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Replace foreach with open (to get an Enumerable) and find:

FasterCSV.open('newfile.csv', 'w') do |output|
    output << FasterCSV.open('names.csv').find { |r| r.index('foo') }[2]
end

The index call will return nil if it doesn't find anything; that means that the find will give you the first row that has 'foo' and you can pull out the column at index 2 from the result.

If you're not certain that names.csv will have what you're looking for then a bit of error checking would be advisable:

FasterCSV.open('newfile.csv', 'w') do |output|
    foos_row = FasterCSV.open('names.csv').find { |r| r.index('foo') }
    if(foos_row)
        output << foos_row[2]
    else
        # complain or something
    end
end

Or, if you want to silently ignore the lack of 'foo' and use an empty string instead, you could do something like this:

FasterCSV.open('newfile.csv', 'w') do |output|
    output << (FasterCSV.open('names.csv').find { |r| r.index('foo') } || ['','',''])[2]
end

I'd probably go with the "complain if it isn't found" version though.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, really interesting and the explanations are really helpful. What if I wanted to return something other than the first instance? My understanding is that .index only returns the first instance so if I should want the 2nd / 3rd / whatever instance, where would it change? Thanks again. –  MarkL Aug 23 '11 at 6:05
    
@MarkL: index is just being used to see if the row has 'foo', you could use whatever test is appropriate. If you want all the matching rows then there's find_all. –  mu is too short Aug 23 '11 at 6:28
    
ok, so .index returns one instance of foo, whilst find_all returns all instances of foo? I had thought that .index returned the first instance of foo (hence the confusion) thx again. –  MarkL Aug 23 '11 at 6:32
    
@MarkL: No, index finds the index of what you're looking for or nil if it isn't there. find returns first value of the iterator where the block returns a true value. –  mu is too short Aug 23 '11 at 6:46
    
ah ok, thank you. –  MarkL Aug 23 '11 at 12:31

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